Praising God: Psalm-singing, some new hymns, chords for Book of Psalms for Singing…

by andrewlohr

Praise triune Jehovah! Here’s how: PSALMS, new hymns, swap tunes, epistle…

a2, we respond to God.
—-Jesus Christ is Lord / to the glory of God the Father / confessed by the Holy Ghost.
-b1, praise triune Jehovah! Here’s (some of) how: Psalms, new hymns, methods…
—–[–c1, all 150 Psalms audio (NOT up as of 23 June A.D. 2007.)]
–c2, Psalm versions and fragments by me (Andrew Lohr)–Ps 2 Joplin tune, 136 to “I said I wasn’t…”
–c3, Hymns by me. (“Tax Day hymn” IS on THIS page; links for others)
–c4, Epistle of Andrew: Take Hold.
–c5. How to swap tunes (This refers to hymnbooks, NOT Napster!!!)
–c6. How to sing Psalms.
—– d1 how
—– d2 some of my favorites in “BPS” listed
—– d3 BPS chords for Psalms 1-150 (complete)
–c7. Why sing Psalms? (Love God? Love God’s lyrics.)
–c8 (BLOG zone): What I think of “The Plainsong Psalter”
– – – – – – – –
Q “Triune Jehovah”? A Yes, God is triune–Father Son and Holy Ghost (see b3, How to improve churches)–and Jehovah is a good English Name for Him (even if bad Hebrew), though its use is (now) optional since it barely hangs on by its fingernails in the New Testament (in “Hallelu-jah” in Revelation.) Still, I think the Old Testament often calls for a NAME, not just the title “LORD” (and I’m in the good company of John Calvin, Geerhardus Vos, and James Jordan on this, though Vos and Jordan may prefer “Yahweh” to “Jehovah.”) / A.W. Pink of (largely) blessed memory also used “triune Jehovah.”
Q: “Jesus Christ is Lord
/ to the glory of God the Father
/ confessed by the Holy Ghost”?
A: I notice that most NT books begin with a statement about Jesus and God. (Glance thru them all and see this. Mt: Son of David son of Abraham. Mk (majority text) Son of God. Jn…the Word was God (Greek word-order, “God was the Word”.) …) Paul, e.g. in Colossians, seems to have trouble stopping mentioning the name of Jesus as he (Paul) starts a letter. So maybe Christian endeavors–I’m thinking especially about church services–should often START with some kind of confession of faith, some “creed,” which may vary as NT book openings vary. I put forth the above as a possibility brethren in Christ Jesus are welcome to use. (It draws on Philippians 2 and I Corinthians 12.) Let the pastor/worship leader say this, and everyone echo it back to him (or her in some cases): Jesus Christ is Lord/to the glory of God the Father/confessed by the Holy Ghost.

(re c1, complete Psalms 1-150 audio: not up yet, and the 20-odd friends to whom I have given sets which I’ve made by gracious permission of the copyright holder should keep their sets. What I hope to post here sometime uses mostly words from the A.D. 1650 Scottish psalter to old tunes, copyrights died of old age, and lacks practice and enthusiasm compared to what I gave y’all. The reason I want to post this here sometime is to DEMONSTRATE, to show by EXAMPLE not just argument, that it is POSSIBLE to sing ALL of EACH Psalm. (Tape sets have sometimes taken less than 460 minutes; less than 8 hours for all of each of the 150 Psalms, including headings.)
If you want a set of tapes that includes all 150 Psalms complete, click on http://www.psalms4u.com and contact those people; they don’t offer such a set, but I did send them one of my homemade sets last millenium, and if they still have the tapes, which use their book, you MIGHT or might not be able to talk them into making you a copy; and if you ask for a copy, maybe they’ll get on the stick and create their own version, studio quality. I wish someone would. I’ve heard a runor some opera singer is. Last I knew, their phone number was 412-241-0436, their mailing address Crown and Covenant Publications, 7418 Penn Ave, Pittsburg PA 15208, and their email psalms4u@aol.com.

c2. New Psalm versions: Psalm 2 to Scott Joplin tune, Psalm 136 to Afro-American call-and-response tune are HERE (lyrics and tune-INSTRUCTIONS; not audio, and not musical notation).
d1. Psalm 2; sing to tune from Scott Joplin’s “The Entertainer” (first movement twice, then 2nd movement twice). Slants (“/”) mark pauses in the music, when you sing the same syllable (or same vowel) for a little longer (if you’re familiar with the tune, you may understand.)
—verses 1-3. Why do/the hea/then rage?
Why do the pa-a-gans day/dream in vain?
The leading men/make up/their minds,
the rulers get/toge/ther and scheme
against the LORD/who’s in/control
and his anointed Messi/ah the King?
“Now let us tear off their chains
and let us throw off their ropes”
say the conspirators dur/ing their fling.

—verses 4-6. He who sits/in Hea/ven laughs
as he hears all that they plan/the Lord scoffs.
He tells them some/thing while/he’s mad
he lets them know that he’ll kno/ck off their socks.
“I have enthroned/my cho/sen King
upon Mount Zi/on my ho/ly hill.”
Now here’s Jeho/vah’s decree
here’s what the LORD said to me:
“You are my Son, ask from me what you will.

—verses 7-10. “I have become/your fa/ther tell Me what You want
if you ask me for the nations I will give you every people
you’ll possess/ even earth’s far/thest shores
and you shall rule/ them with an iron rod.
Your royal scep/ter will smash them like a/clay jug
until every heart obeys your word.
Therefore you kings/of earth/be wise and worship the LORD;
rejoice with justice, you who judge.

—verses 11-12. Serve now Jeho/vah, fear/ him all you kings of men
Kiss the Son of God, you rulers
if you get Him mad he’ll smash you
Men can/not resist our Ma/ker’s wrath
when he from kind/ness quickly turns to rage.
And on the o/ther hand blessed are all/those who
take their refuge only in the Son.
“And if you kiss/the Son,”/ declares the King of kings,
“you are my children/whom I love.”
————–
– – – – – – – –
d2. Psalm 136 to Afro-American call-and-response tune “I said I wasn’t gonna tell nobody but I/COULDN’T KEEP IT TO MYSELF”; this may sound better with two song leaders and two groups (e.g. men and women). 2nd group’s lines are in ALL CAPS. (You might want to sing the last line of each stanza all together.)
—verses 1-6
Give thanks to God because he’s good
because
NOTHING EVER SHAKES HIS LOVE
because
NOTHING EVER SHAKES HIS LOVE
because
NOTHING EVER SHAKES HIS LOVE
Give thanks unto the God of gods because
NOTHING EVER SHAKES HIS LOVE
Nothing ever shakes his love!
He’s Lord of lords
NOTHING SHAKES HIS LOVE
He does mighty
MIGHTY DEEDS
Heavens he has made
NOTHING SHAKES HIS LOVE
Made the sea and…
SEA AND THE LAND
His love
NEVER FAILS
God’s love
NEVER FAILS
His love
NEVER FAILS
God’s love
NEVER FAILS
Nothing ever shakes his love!
—verses 7-14
He made great lights: sun moon and stars
because
NOTHING EVER SHAKES HIS LOVE
because
NOTHING EVER SHAKES HIS LOVE
because
NOTHING EVER SHAKES HIS LOVE
Egyptian firstborn Yahweh killed because
NOTHING EVER SHAKES HIS LOVE
Out of there he turned us loose
With a mighty hand
NOTHING SHAKES HIS LOVE
And a stretched-out
STRETCHED OUT ARM
Tore the sea apart
NOTHING SHAKES HIS LOVE
And he walked us
RIGHT THROUGH THE SEA!
His love
NEVER FAILS
God’s love
NEVER FAILS
His love
NEVER FAILS
God’s love
NEVER FAILS
Nothing ever shakes his love!
—verses 15-22
God shook Pharaoh into the sea because
NOTHING EVER SHAKES HIS LOVE
because
NOTHING EVER SHAKES HIS LOVE
because
NOTHING EVER SHAKES HIS LOVE
He led us through the wilderness because
NOTHING EVER SHAKES HIS LOVE
Nothing ever shakes his love!
God a-slaughtered kings
NOTHING SHAKES HIS LOVE
Slaughtered mighty
MIGHTY KINGS
Sihon and King Og
NOTHING SHAKES HIS LOVE
Gave their land to
US WHO SERVE HIM!
His love
NEVER FAILS
God’s love
NEVER FAILS
His love
NEVER FAILS
God’s love
NEVER FAILS
Nothing ever shakes his love!
—verses 23-26
When we were down God knew our names because
NOTHING EVER SHAKES HIS LOVE
because
NOTHING EVER SHAKES HIS LOVE
because
NOTHING EVER SHAKES HIS LOVE
He freed us from our enemies because
NOTHING EVER SHAKES HIS LOVE
Nothing ever shakes his love!
He feeds everything
NOTHING SHAKES HIS LOVE
O give thanks to
THANKS TO HIM!
Thanks to Heaven’s God
NOTHING SHAKES HIS LOVE
O give thanks to
OUR LORD AND GOD!
His love
NEVER FAILS
God’s love
NEVER FAILS
His love
NEVER FAILS
God’s love
NEVER FAILS
Nothing ever shakes his love!
– – – – – – – -c3. New hymns. (Tax Day hymns is HERE on lohr84.com after two links.)
27 Nov ’07, new hymn. Rhythm 8,8,8, 8,8,8–find a tune you like in a hymnbook’s “Metrical Index,” or write your own. Tune in mind: “This little babe, so few days old” (sung at “Biblical Horizons” conferences, but not commonly known.)
1. Look at the king of God’s own race
Blood from his crown drips down his face
His crown is thorn, his throne a cross
Yet his each pain is Satan’s loss
What we owe God and cannot pay
Jesus’ dark death carries away.
2. Look at the man of flesh and blood
Flogged to the bone by mockers rude
Tempted to fight, or to refuse
to stand in man’s–yea, in my–shoes.
Man he became, flesh he took on
To save us he came to this throne.
3. Look at the risen son of God
Empty his grave, renewed his robe.
Said Church and state that he must die?
His risen life gives them the lie
Heaven and earth are his domain
And from his Throne we too do reign.

Chant (not set to music by me; just rhythmic). 4 Dec ’07.
Love the Lord your God
Love the Lord your God
Love the Lord your God
with all your heart and soul and mind
Love the Lord your God
Love the Lord your God
Love the Lord your God
and love your neighbor as yourself.

—- Until I get this material on THIS site, you can look it up at two other sites. One is http://writetohim.bravehost.com. There, on the list at upper right, click on “Our writers.” Hymns by me appear there–words only, with tunes suggested–in the following order:
God’s 10 Commandments
Test the spirits
Hymn from Psalm 65:1-4
“It is finished!” Jesus said
Hymn from Mt 24/Mk 13/Lk 21
St Patrick’s Gorget, and, St Patrick’s Breastplate
Then come three pieces by Jane Freuler. Then:
Hymn from Isaiah 53: Who is this ugliest of men?
Hymn from Revelation 5: God’s wondrous Law
– – – – – – – –
The other site is http://www.hornes.org/forums (archived but still there on 14 Apr A.D. 2007).
There, scroll down to the “Music” forum and click; then scroll down to
New paedocommunion hymn (read typo and variations at end).
New Baptism hymn
Singable Hussite paedocommunion hymn.
– – – – – – – –
Tax Day hymn (for Sundays near 15 April in U.S.A.)
1) Amazing grace: an easy tax
count ten and give God one
the IRS’s laws of tax
ten thousand pages run.
2-Amazing grace: God’s tax takes just
one tenth of riches’ growth
whereas the federal system’s tax
takes two, three times as much.
3-Amazing grace: an equal tax:
a tenth from everyone.
No breaks for either rich or poor
God says such breaks are sin.
4-Stupendous grace: we pay God’s tax
to any priest we choose.
No choice have voters but to pay
guys that we hoped would lose.
[In other words: triune Jehovah is MUCH more glorious than the I.R.S. / Sing this to the tune of “Amazing Grace”–or “Gilligan’s Island”–or most any other “C.M.” (“Common Meter,” 8 syllables in first line, 6 in 2nd, 8 in 3rd, 6 in 4th; = 8.6.8.6.) tune.] “Such breaks are sin,” Ex 23:3, Lev 19:15.

c4. TAKE HOLD: an Epistle of Andrew (Lohr, in Chattanooga)
–Brothers and sisters in Christ Jesus! My fellow saints, my fellow holy people! Let us take hold of God’s grace to us, take hold in our very hearts of the great things he has done for us. He has firmly set his love upon us. He himself has become flesh, has become a man, one of us. He has suffered and resisted every kind of temptation and pressure we face. God in Christ Jesus does not just know about us; by his own experience he empathizes with us. And we have not just heard about God far off; the Son has shown us exactly how the Father is; Jesus Christ is the exact image of our Father in Heaven, the perfect photograph. We have the Son; we have this connection with God! Take hold and rejoice as God the Holy Ghost writes this on our hearts!
–And when it’s hard to rejoice, when hope is far off, when sin and death are close, remember that Jesus wept, and that he died for our sins and rose from the dead for our justification. Let us throw ourselves on his righteousness, as the hymn says: “I dare not trust the sweetest frame”–dare not trust how good (or bad) I feel–“but wholly lean on Jesu’s name,” on who He is. Let us reject temptation, and throw ourselves into his love. Let us not be squeezed into the mold of this world, but be metamorphosized–be changed, like a butterfly out of a caterpillar–by taking hold of God and his grace.
–Is there sin in us? There is even more righteousness in Jesus Christ our Savior. Let no sin cause us to depair; God forgave idolatrous Israel, and adulterous-murderous David, and Manassah who filled Jerusalem with innocent blood, and Peter who denied Christ by oath, and Saul the persecutor, and the adulterous Corinthians, when they turned away from their sins to him and his way. For the prodigal son who returns to him from the pigsty, our Father throws a party to celebrate. Give thanks to him!
–We have the privilege, brothers and sisters, of throwing everything that might worry us onto him because he cares for us. How many bad things that we think might happen to us do Not happen! Do we suffer? (“Suffer” by US standards; our brothers and sisters in Saudi Arabia and North Korea, fiercely persecuted for the Name of Jesus, might not think we’re suffering much. Please remember to pray for them and for all God’s church.) God trusts us to carry, today, the cross he assigns us today, as our Father trusted his Son Jesus with the heaviest cross of all because he loves us. Do we trust him so as to distrust and reject what Satan offers us?
–God is faithful. Jesus died–and our Father raised him from the dead. Take hold of God’s faithfulness. God is very wise. Do we attend to what he says? Have you read the whole Bible, and are you continuing to read the whole Bible? As we read it, do we obey it, do we obey God who wrote it? He tells us that every bit of it is useful for teaching the truth, for straightening people out, for training us how to live. Take hold of God’s wise advice, and of what he prefers, and of his orders to obey.
–God is our Creator. If he didn’t like flowers, and thunderstorms, babies, and groups of his people, working, and resting, music, and creativity, he wouldn’t have created this world and declared all of it to be very good. Jesus was a baby, a boy, a carpenter, a small-group leader, a preacher of repentence (of changing from sin to righteousness), a victim of mistreatment, a dead corpse–he didn’t just float along on a cloud polishing his halo, he was HERE! His resurrection shall be our resurrection; take hold of it; our tombs and our fathers’ tombs will be as empty as his; his judgment of us on the Judgment Day will be righteous judgment. As righteousness abounds in the risen-and-transformed body of Jesus, so God promises us a new heavens and a new earth abounding in righteousness. Are our lives today lining up with what we shall be? Are we today, in the choices of this hour and minute–political choices, sexual choices, choices in use of time and money–lining up with who God is?
(Andrew Lohr, son of missionaries to Pakistan)

c5. How to swap tunes.

–Many hymnals have a “metrical index,” which tells you the “meter” (rhythm) of each tune used, the number of syllables in each line. If you dislike or don’t know a tune, you MAY be able to use a different tune of the same meter. For example, many “C.M.” (Common Meter) tunes can be sung using the tune of “Amazing Grace” (or “Gilligan’s Island.”) Sometimes each page in a hymnbook gives the meter of the tune on that page. (Be sure to TRY OUT a different tune BEFORE asking a whole church to sing it!)
A fairly good musician may be able to compose new tunes–James Ward, for instance, has done this for “Rock of Ages” (whose meter is 7.7.7.7.7.7, six lines each of seven syllables; I THINK Jim’s website it http://www.jameswardmusic.com; I KNOW he’s chief musician at http://www.newcityfellowship.com).
–Newer music tends to use new meters for each song, but new words can be put to popular tunes. Martin Luther did some of this in the A.D. 1500s. Churches inspired by Gene Edwards (www.geneedwards.com) do some of it now. I’m not sure of copyright complications this might get you into.
–Here’s a list of tunes for a few widely used meters:
—Short Meter Double (SMD): 6,6,8,6; 6,6,8,6 syllables per line
Make me a captive, Lord
Crown Him with many crowns
–Common Meter (CM): 8,6,8,6 syllables per line
Am I a soldier of the cross?
O for a thousand tongues to sing (James Ward has a mod tune for this)
Amazing Grace
–Common Meter Double (CMD): 8,6,8,6 twice
The Son of God goes forth to war
There is a fountain filled with blood
–Long Meter (LM): 8,8,8,8, syllables per line
Doxology
When I survey the wondrous cross
–8,7,8,7 Double (= twice: 8787D)
Glorious things of thee are spoken
All the way my Savior leads me

c6. How to sing Psalms (c7, next, deals with WHY sing Psalms?)
d1, exhortation; d2, list of some of my BPS favorites; d3, chords for BPS

d1. –ONE way, NOT the only way, to sings Psalms is to go to http://www.psalms4u.com and buy “The Book of Psalms for Singing” (BPS), along with the set of cassettes or of CDs that includes each tunes in BPS played once. Then listen to each tune while looking at the words in the book, and learn to sing each; and sing them all, all of each, for triune Jehovah gave us all of each and says (II Tim 3:15-16) that all of them are useful. Meanwhile, pray to Him, who gave us these lyrics (or at least these lyric-concepts, translated into English lyrics from the original Hebrew) to show us Himself in them, Jesus–God in human flesh–in them (for many of them tell us how he felt and what he did or suffered), and how they relate to our lives, 3000 years after David (in whom God inspired many of the Psalms) and 2000 years after Jesus was on earth; to use them in us by the Holy Ghost.
–www.psalms4u.com also sells (maybe gives) a list of familiar tunes BPS uses. For instance, Psalm 3 in BPS uses the tune of “Amazing Grace.” That’s a good start, an easy way to sing SOME Psalms; by swapping tunes (c5 above) to sing quite a number.
–www.psalms4u.com also sells a thin (half inch thick or so, designed to tuck behind a hymnal in a hymnal rack) words-only Psalter (no printed music) which includes their version of how to swap tunes, and gives tune suggestions for each Psalm.
–Of course fairly good musicians can come up with new tunes.
–There are other Psalters besides BPS. BPS is my personal favorite because it gives all of each Psalm without too much paraphrasing or condensing (or adding) on the way from Hebrew into English, and uses tunes that I, with only a little musical training, can play and sing (and swap). I have probably sung through it about 4 times a year since A.D. 1992. It took me several months to work through it for the first time (a fairly good keyboard musician could probably sit down with it and play it without practice.) I’ve played each Psalm tune in the “Psalter Hymnal” of the Christian Reformed Church; it paraphrases and condenses a lot (its English, while usually smoother than BPS, is farther from the Hebrew); I like some of its tunes better and some less well than BPS, but BPS is the one I use more days than not and the “Psalter Hymnal” only when I happen to feel like it. I’ve also played each Psalm tune in an old (A.D. 1927) United Presbyterian “The Psalter Hymnal”; I like some of them quite a bit (e.g. Psalm 76, Psalm 81), but BPS is the one I use. (BPS is better organized; more Psalmy, less hymny–e.g. BPS is numbered by Psalm number and also numbers verses; the 1927 book is numbered by selection, giving Psalm numbers in small print, and doesn’t number Bible verses.). I also own a “Book of Praise: Anglo-Genevan Psalter” of the Canadian Reformed Church, and might post here some tips for its use, but it uses an unfamiliar (tho not hard) musical notation, and I don’t much like the Genevan tunes when I do figure them out. It paraphrases (but does not condense; its Psalm 119 has 28 stanzas while the Christian Reformed Psalter Hymnal, using the same tune, has only 8 stanzas). I think Providence Presbyterian Church in St. Louis, Missouri, pastor Jeff Meyers, uses it, if you want to talk with someone who does use it. My copy is dated A.D. 1984, and gives mailing address: Send orders to Premier Printing Ltd., 1249 Plessis Road, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R2C 3L9. All other correspondence to: Standing Committee for the Publication of the Book of Praise, c/o Theological College, 110 West 27th St, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L9C 5A1. My guess is the Canadian Reformed Church has a website by now, and I do not guarantee those 20-year-old addresses are good, but you’re welcome to try.
–Q Are you sure this is non-copyright? A I’ve come up with it myself, so I assume so; you can mail me to correct me (at 807-C Poindexter Ave, East Ridge, TN 37412). I assume the publishers of BPS realize that the bits and pieces I quote from BPS will not enable anyone who does not get a copy to sing anything of theirs; I’m making it easier (I hope) for some middling musicians to sing Psalms using their book.
–Q Do you gain from selling BPS? A: No (except that the more Psalm-singing, compared to now, the better the world I live in will be.)
–Q. Does Psalm-singing guarantee Godliness? A: Of course not. What is does, is to receive from God something (Psalm lyrics, or at least lyric-concepts) that God has supplied to us for our use. Many of us (Christians) don’t even reach out to receive from God this which He supplies to us. (We also neglect to receive some of His other supplies; see a2b3 below on “How to improve Bapti-terian churches” [when I get it posted]). Singing Psalms also honors God by paying attention to him; has your earthly darling ever dragged you to a concert that s/he chose and you went to, not (at first) because you loved the music, but because you loved the darling? And if we sing the lyrics of, say, Isaac Watts and Fanny Crosby while neglecting those of Jehovah, does not our practice affirm that they wrote better lyrics than He? / (Fictitious examples of unGodliness combined with Psalm-singing, unGodliness in societies that did lots of Psalm-singing, occur in the novels NORTHWEST PASSAGE by Kenneth Roberts and THE MAYOR OF CASTORBRIDGE by Thomas Hardy. (I suggest you not read Hardy; I didn’t like it. What’s there to care about in petty atheism? Roberts might have been an atheist, but he’s not petty. {Nor is his book; it’s quite long.])) In the Bible, of course, the Pharisees knew the Psalms well. And of course I can look in the mirror and see a guy who sings Psalms and is less holy than Jesus. The point, or a point, is to know God in general, and Jesus Christ in particular, via the Psalms, not just to read or memorize or sing them; and to let God affect our lives through them. Musicians, in particular, would do well to get familiar with God’s own lyrics before they write too many of their own, as saith Tim Gallant–www.timgallant.org, I think.)
QC: even the BPS is not really “Psalms;” it paraphrases, turning the psalms into hymns that rhyme and have strict rhythm! A: When we’re all fluent in OT Hebrew, we can sing the Psalms in Hebrew (Suzanne Haik-Vantoura thinks the Hebrew includes the original tunes. Might get her stuff at http://www.kingdavidsharp.com or something like that?). Until then, BPS gives us at least some (fairly close) version of the psalms in English; if not 100%, say 60%, more or less? The glass is half full. (The Christian Reformed “Psalter Hymnal” does a good job in most of its paraphrasing and condensing, but when it reduces 28 stanzas to 8, I’m not sure the glass is half full.) If you think the psalms, in strict English translation, should be chanted or sung to (new) tunes that fit the words, fine; give us singable chants. Of course ANY English version, even Young’s Literal Bible which I love, will change the original to some extent. (I have devised, and with audio intend to post, a simple chant that can be used, I think, for ANY words in any non-tonal language; I devised it for Psalm 119 in an effort to sing one of the hardest psalms.) And those who have a higher taste in music (or at least think they do) need to LEAD people of lower taste up to their heights, please. The BPS people do at least sell those tapes/(CDs?) with all their tunes on them. On this site I’m trying to help people get up to the BPS level, and encouraging them to move higher if they can. (Stay tuned for Psalms set to Mozart and Wagner tunes.) Do thou likewise or better.
Q Hardest Psalms? A 119 is the longest, 58 the nastiest, 88 the downest, if you ask me.
–c6d2. Here are some of my favorites (tunes I like) from BPS. The publishers’ list of familiar tunes BPS uses may list some hymns whose tunes you like. In this list, if I know a hymn that uses the same tune, I mention the hymn title; I do not consider these hymns widely known (I haven’t seen them in many of the churches I’ve visited.) Maybe you’ll also like some of these.
22I Exalt the Lord, his praise proclaim
23C
32B
42B
48B To us a child of hope is born

51A, B, C, F
63A
69E
71C
73A, B, C

78A
81B
85A O thou to whose all-searching sight
85B The Lord has heard and answered prayer

92A, B (same tune for both)
102A
104D
105C
107A O praise the Lord for He is good

119A, G, M, N
135B Hallelujah, praise Jehovah, from the heavens…(without its refrain)
144D Arise, O God, and shine

Maybe this list will also help some people get into singing some Psalms. (Another approach: a friend of mine, a capable keyboard musician, looked at BPS’s list of composers and started by playing the tunes composed by composers of good reputation.)

c6d3.–Andrew Lohr’s accordion chords for BPS (sharps and flats I mostly leave you to figure out), and as I work on this my exact version (exact method of notation) may vary from Psalm to Psalm.
–For those with a copy of BPS, here are trial-and-error accordion chords–I hope their errors are not too much trial for you–for what they’re worth. Psalm “1A” and “1B” in BPS are two different versions of Psalm 1; Psalm 119 A through X are mostly the different parts of Psalm 119 set to different tunes. Get a copy of BPS and you’ll understand. I do this to try to make the road into Psalms easier for some middling musicians, or at least to encourage some who find this technically useless that it CAN be DONE.
There are SOME similarities between guitar chords and accordion chords and electric-organ chords. The chords I use I’ve pencilled into my personal copy of BPS (figuring them out and trying them was what took me a few months).
–To explain the notation, I’ll start with Psalm 3 in BPS, which uses the tune of “Amazing Grace,” a tune lots of people know: I’m sure the recent movie “Amazing Grace” must’ve used the tune, and Scotty’s bagpipes played it at Spock’s funeral in the old “Star Trek 2” movie. I presume you are looking at a copy of BPS, at Psalm 3. Slashes / will represent bar lines. Words will refer to chord changes within a bar; the chord BEFORE a word or part of a word BEGINS on that word or part of a word; hyphens divide words, e.g. “/D -y/” below means that in a bar which begins using G chord, and contains the word “many,” G chord is used on “man-” and D chord on “-y;” then the next bar begins with G chord. When one syllable uses two chords, I put one chord before the syllable and one after, e.g. “C va-in G” (which is followed by C chord on the word “for.”) Once you’ve figured this out on this tune, other tunes should come easier, I imagine. And if you’re a better musician than I–most musicians are!–God bless you in praising him better than I and leading others (even me, perhaps) to do so! (Words I refer to are in first stanzas.) I’m sure I’ll make both musical and typographical errors; please forgive and correct these. (Around Chattanooga, I know the Covenant College library has a couple copies of BPS. I imagine the city library, for a fee, could borrow you one by inter-library loan. Or, as I wrote above, you can buy yourself one or many.)
As I worked on this on and off, I improved (?) my notation and made it clearer. After getting to 150 I might go back and redo the first few dozen. (You might start with Psalm 150 and work forwards; I’d forgotten what my notation used to look like. Or even skip down to Psalm 5 or so, where I started separating printed lines.)
Assuming you have a copy of BPS, pencil in the chords, try them, and correct them–or whatever proceedure works for you..

Psalm 3, tune “Amazing Grace”: G//D my/GC/G//D -y/G///C va-in G C for/G//D re- /G.

*Psalm 1A, tune “Am I a soldier of the Cross?: G/D -ed/C D Who/G D not G a-/G stra-ay D/G C un-/G/A D in G sin- D -ners’ /G. / I (Andrew Lohr) like this tune: -like-

Psalm 1B: D/ A the/D/G do-es A G not/D A Where /D wi-ick A D -ed / G me-en E D would/A D his/A D Nor/D A in/D/E si-inA E -ful/A D Nor /A D up-/Eo-on A B the /A E -ner’s/A /B/A G is/A/D/D me-ed A D -i-/G –ta-a- A d-tion/G da-ay D A and /D.
–(Note: in the word “Jehovah’s,” there should be a bar line printed between Je and ho.)

Psalm 2: D G -then /D A -tions D rage / D do-o A G pe-eo A D -ples / A D mind? / D G in/D A en- D -gage/D A -ers G ar-re A D in / A D -bined / A D -ga-inst E A Je/D E -vah A high / E A-and B A a-a- A D -gainst / F E sway/ D E break A their / D E they A cry / E A u-us D G ca-ast A D their / D -way.

*Psalm 3, above. Q: Asterisk? (*)? A Indicates a tune I like; **indicates I like it a lot.

*Psalm 4A: G gi-ive D / G / G a-an D G -swer / C whe-en D C “I” / G Go-od D / G / G ri-ight- D G -eous-/D/D Ha-ave G / D / D he-ar G D my / G D Thou / G C En-/G /D/ G/C/ G A me/ G D dis-/G//. -like-

Psalm 4A done again: G Gi-ive D / G/Ga-an D G/C whe-en D C / G G Go-od D/G /G ri-ight- D G/ D/D Ha-ave G/ D / D he-ar G D / G D/ G C/G / D / G / C / G A / G D/ G/G -like

Ps 4B: C F when C / B C /C G jus-/ C/ C F stress C/E A / B D grace / A cri-ies G / G/ C/ G/ CBC / C G love C/ F / C G C G /C/

**PS 5A: E/ E ho-o-B E / B E/ B / B E / B A/A E/ E/ E/ B/ E/ A/ E B/ E B/ E B/ E/
E/ E/ A/ E/ E A/ E/ B E/ B/ E /E/ A /E E A/E E B/ E

(the above, thru 5A, posted by 23 June A.D. 2007).

Ps. 5B: E E Je B A ho D G vah / A B E / A B E B / E ten B A B /
E E my B A cry D G / A B E / B A Ii D G D / A B E /
C G C D / G B Oo D G / A B A D / G D and A G /
C D G G / A A B / E E keep B A con D G / A B E .
27 Sept A.D. 2007. In that one, I put down a chord for every syllable (I think); slashes (/) are bar lines; each line (words between two bass clef and treble clef) in BPS is a line here; if a syllable has two chords, the letters of the syllable appear between the chords. “Ii” and “Oo” are the words “I” and “O” split between two chords.
Q Is your notation evolving? A No; I am bringing intelligence to bear upon its design.

Ps 6: AAA DD / A E7 / AA /
AA E7 A / B7 E7 / AA / E7— / (E7 for four syllables)
B7- / E7- /AA DD / A E7 / A.

Ps 7A: EE A / E B AA / E B / E /
EE F / E B A E / B F / B /
B EE/ A like B E / EE A E / A /
B EE / A B E E / A F / E.

*Ps 7B: EE B / E A EE/A found C# B / E /
E B E / AA E A E right A E / B /
EE B / EE A E B E / A
F# B A / B A EE B eve- B B / E

Q In a two-chord syllable, with chords before and after the syllable, why not connect the syllable with the chords by hyphens? A Because I use hyphens to indicate which end of the syllable is connected with the rest of the word (if the syllable is from a longer word).
Q What about a three-chord syllable? A I’ll cross that bridge when I come to it ([probably using [brackets].

PS 8A: G / G D G C / DD G G
C D E A / D D / GG C G
D G D G / D C D / G

PS 8B: GG C D / G D G earth C G / C G C -lent D G / D
GG C D / G D G set C G / C G C of D G / D
G C G C / G D – fants G D / G D the G D G / D praise C D com- G D
GG C D / G D G -mies C G / C G a- D G D G

*PS 9A: F / F B F / F C F / F thanks C B C / F
F / B F B / FFF / C F G / C
C / F B F / F C F / F -ult – B C / F
F / B F B / F C FF / F C C / F

*PS 9B: A / DD B / EE A / AA E / A
A / DD B / EE A / AA E / A
A / AAA / AAA / A F A / E
A / DD B / EE A / AA E / A

PS 10A: EE B / EE / AA BB / E / E B E
A E / EE B E / B / EE B / EE
AA CC / B / B E B / EE A B / E B / E

PS 10B: D / DD G D / E G AA / D
D / G F# D F# / BBB E / A
D / D G A D / A D AA / F#
D / DD G D / DDD A / D

PS 11; A / D AA E / AA
E A BB / E A / D AA E
A E A A / E A D E A

PS 12A; A / A E / A E / E grant D D / AA
E A / F god- D D / A / E E / A E / A E
E sons D D / AA / D B / A E A
Note: several syllables in that tune have two NOTES in the melody but the same CHORD (e.g. in the last line, ” / D B /,” that “D” has two notes on the syllable “faith-.” I have NOT indicated such syllables in which the note changes but the chord (according to me) does not.
Q Is this the first time? A No.

PS 12B; DD G / D G / AA D G / AA D
D C# C# / D B / AA D E / A
A E A / D D hood A / DD G D / E -oth- B E
A A7 A / D G A D / D A / D

Q A7? Answer: Yeah, probably because plain A didn’t sound quite right to me and A7, if not correct, at least sounded different. (Cover one mistake with another?) Often if I indicate 7th chords, major chords will do. (I had about 6 months of accordion lessons from Miss Brell–her name has changed since–and no music theory at all. Better musicians, praise God better than I.)

PRAY PS 13; F / FFFF / FFFF
BB C7 C / F C / FF DD
F C D G / FF B C / F
Q Pray? A, Yes, the words of this psalm are addressed to God, so pray it to him. (If a song is a prayer, pray it to God, and let the songleader or worship leader or preacher or choir director explicitly TELL the singers to do so; this is one way to beef up the PRAYER element of a service.)

PS 14A; EEE A F EE BB
E B E F B EEE A F
EE B E A E BB E

Q No bar lines there? A No, not as printed; nor in the next, which is in some way the same tune, though it seems to feature two treble clefs for each base clef (Tenor atop; soprano and alto in the middle; bass at the bottom. Whatever that means.)

ps 14b; FF CC B FF CC F C GG C
B FF C G F C7 F C F B one C D CC F

PS 14C; B / FFF G / GCC / FF A C /F
A / BB CC / FF C / GGG A / D
B / F C F C / F C F / C G F E / A
G / CC F G / G C B / GG AA / D

PRAY *PS 15; G C G / AAA / G a- D C D / G
G C G / A AA/ G a D B D / G
DD G / D G D / GG D / G D G
G C G / A E C / G un- D B D / G

Q: Why “-a-” or “a” when the printed text has “A-” and “A”? Answer: To distinguish the syllables (-a- and a) from chords. Chords are all caps. Syllables consisting of the letter a or the letter e by itself will be use a small (lower case) a or e, not a CAPITAL (UPPER CASE). Q Other letters b-g? A I don’t think any of those except the vowels a and e can be a syllable by itself; they should come with small letters attached, and thus be distinguished from chords.

PS 16A; G / GG DD / G D G D Je- A / D A D A / D
G Thou D / G D my G D G a- D / G D from A D / G No D G A do D G D / G

Ps 16B*; A / A DD / A D B / A B F / E
E My B / A DD / A D B / A You F EE / A
A / E C E / DDD / A B F / E
E If B / A DD / A D B / A no- F EE / A

Pray Ps 17A (and 17B and 17C); 17A: A / AA / EE / A E / AA / EE / [ A to E A ] / E
E / AE / AA / D A / E E / A D / D do A E / A

PRAY PS 17B; A / A E / A D / A D / A E
A E / A A / E E / A E / A D
AA / EE / AA / E A E / A

PRAY PS 17C; F / C F B F / CC F F / G D CC / C
C / FFFF / BBB G / FF CC / F

PS 18A: E / E B E A / E B / E E
E B F B / E F / B E / EE A E
B E / B B / E B E B / E B / E

PS 18 B: E DD / G D E G / E / A The D GG
C G C D / G / G CC / D G D G
A / A E C / CC A B / E

PS 18 C; A / A C F D / E D -cued E AA
D E A B / E B E A / A C F D me F
E D me E AA / D E A F -ger B / A E A

PS 18 D; C / G F -cious A G C / F G C G
C per- D G D G / A D G C / G C GG
CC GG / F G CC / D G C

PS 18 E; D / D G A D / GG D / A DD
AA B E / A D / D F E D / E A F
D B E / A D G A / D

PS 18F; E / E A / B E / A E / BB
F B / E B / FF / BB / E B F E
A E / BB / A E / B A / E B / E

PS 18 G; D / D A DD / G A G D / A
D / G D G D / DDDD / A
A / D A DD / AA D E / A
D/ G A7 D horn A7 G / D G D A / D

PS 18 H ; B / BB EE / FF BB / F
F / B C G C / F B -dled C F C / F
F / B F BB / E B F B came C / F
B / F B F E / BB C F / B

PS 18 i; CCC / G C / F C F G / C / C B# D
G D / GG A D / G / GGG / G F A
G D G F / G / C G C / G F C F / G my C G / C

PS 18 J; DDD / [D You A D ] / G D G A / D
D / G D / G D A E / A E / A
D G A / DD / G D A D / A
D / G D G A / [ D all A G D ] A / D A / D

*PS 18 K; F / FFF C / FF G en- B C / FF
C / FFF B / FF C F / CC
F / FFFF / FF F -neath C F / B
B / FFF B / FF G un- F C / F

PS 18 L; DDD / D G DD / D be A E my G / DA
DD A / D C# A B / A E / A
D The A B B / A for G A / D A D E / A
A DD / D A D G -ples E /[D un- G D ] A / D

PS 19A; D / D A D A/ D G / D A -ry D A D our A
DD / D A D A / D G / D A -i- D A D a- A
D D / G A G A doth G / D A -ter D A
A / [D night A D ] G / DD AA / D

Q In your personal copy, do you mark a repeated chord above every note until the chord changes, e.g. FFFF ? A No; e.g. there I just have “F” above the first note of that bar and “B” above the first note of the next. Etc. (This q-a has been moved down from where FFFF occurs.)

PS 19 B; E Je- D / AAA E -fect D / AA / DD EE / A
A his E / AAAA / AA / E D E B / E
E / E A -cepts E / AA / EE / A
A / D fill E / A A with D / A E / A

PS 19 C ; B / BB / F // F / B E / FF / B

PS 19 D; D / GG / D // A / DD / AA / D

PS 19 E; B / FE / D // BE / ED / G

PS 20 A ; G / G C GG / GG C G / GGGG / D
G / GGGG / CCC G / GGG D / G
G / GG G help D G / CCC G / GGGG / D
G / GG G His D G / CCC G / GGG D / G

PS 20 B ; G / D G / C your D D / D D / GG / D Ja- G A
D A / D -alt E A / DD B D / G ho- D G
D G / D G / C G / D G / C Zi- G D / G

Remember: if the NOTE changes on a syllable but the CHORD does not (e.g. “tem-“) in the last line, I only mark the chord once.

PS 21 A; FC / F C F G great F / C F C C / FF B joy- F B / F
FB / CC FF / B F C F Re- C / F -joice B C F C / F
G / A DD C / G A D F / C G C G / C
C F C D C didst D / C F C F What C / F – -e’er C FF C / F

PS 21 B ; B / B F the E BB / B F the E F B / E cov’- F B C F / B
B / B F of E BB / B F Most E B / E king F B shall E B F / B
BF / B F B E / F F -ry F B Who F / B F B E / F
F / B F right E BB / B Fout E F B / E hate F B thee E B F / B

Q Hey, BF on the 3rd line in 21B is on one syllable! A Yes, also FB on the 2nd line in 21A. I figured there was no ambiguity–two chords before a bar line–no need to specify the syllable.
Q Does your personal copy have other marks? A Yeah, I’ve pencilled a line down through most pages at the end of each poetic line, for poetic lines often don’t end at bar lines; so in 21B I’ve drawn a line between “LORD” and “Through,” between High and The, between man and Who, and between all and Who.
Q Why? A Mostly to help when I swap tunes.

PS 21 C; G D / GGGG C G / G joy- D G D G
G D GG C GGG / D
G D / GGGG C G / G free- D D G
G D / GGG D G D / G

PS 21 D; SAME AS 21 C.

PS 22A; DDDD A Oo D / A why D D
BB A E / A DDDD A from D
A giv- D A D D / GG D A / D

(I end 22A on D note rather than F note; two notes lower. Or repeat the last poetic line, ending on F note the first time and D note the 2nd–though nowadays in singing thru the Psalms I usually cut out most of the repetition BPS puts in.)

PS 22B; C / CC B C / B C G E
D G CC / GG / DD G C
B C G E / C A BB / E

PS 22C; C7 D / EE C7 D / GG D G And D / GG A7 C7 / D
(I’d use C7 on all Cs and A7 on all As in 22C.)
G D / CCC Ba- C D / G A D G Now D / GG D me C C /E
(Q Why specify “Ba-“? A To make clear where the word changes chord.)
E C / D B jaws D G / A D G / GG D G CC / D
GD / CC C C my D / G G un- A D G My D / GG A C / E

PS 22D; B / B F B B and F / E F BB
F F me C F C / FF / B to F C my F B F -ren B
F B F B Your E / B E B F / B
(Q Two-note syllables unmarked in last line? A Two notes, but one chord, remember.)

22E; CCC GG/CCC G7
C A DD / C shore G G / F G CC
F G C D / CC D G / C

22F; F / F God B? F / C C7 / C G / C F / FF / F -tress B F
F C / FF / BB / B far C? B / FF / FF
BB / B ag- C B / FF / F plea C F / F day B? F / C C7
C G / C F / FF / F no B F / F C / F

(Q Why the “?”s and 7th chords? A “?” because I’m not sure of that chord–try it and decide what you like. 7th serves to sound a little different, right or not–if one line of music stays the same while another changes, it may sound odd to me at those points; if both change, at least it doesn’t sound clearly wrong.)

22G; D / D GG / G D A / D / G
D / AA D / A / D / G / G D A / D
G / D / AA D / A / A
D / A B / AA D / G A / D A / D
— Watch those bar lines.

22H; E B EEE / AA E / E B EE A
EE B E B EEE / A B -ple A E
A B A E E His B / E B E / B E B EE
A B His A E / E AA E E all B / E B E

22I; A / AA/ EE/ A D / A E E B / EA EA
E A / AE / AE / A / A / A / E / A
E / AEA A / EAE E / AEA A / E / E
ADA A / E / A E / AEA A / DAD D / A E / A

23A; A / AAA E / A D AA
A / E / A E A E
AA D E / AAA E / A

23B; F / F C / F B / F C / F
F / G / C F / F past- C F / C F
C lead- F C / F / B / F C / F

23C; B / B E B / B / E / B
B / B F7 B / E C7 C7 / F7 C7 C7 / F
B B E B / B / E / B
B / B F7 B / E B F7 / B F7 F7 / B
— Love that one. (On the very last F7, I sometimes throw in a C note–two notes higher than the printed tune–on that syllable, after the printed A note.)

23D; E / E A E / A B E / A B E / E
B / E B F / G CC / B FF / B
B EE B / E / A CC / B
B B E B / EE B / E BB / E

(27 OCT ’07)

24A; E / E / E / EE A B / A
E / E / E / EE A B / E
E / B E BB / E B EE / B / B E
B / E A EE / A B AA / E B E B / E

24B; F / F C / F / F / C / F / C G / C
F / B C / F / B -hab- C F / C G / C F / B there F C / F

“Psalm of David”–I’ve written such headings into my personal copy, along with chords and a few other comments.

24C; A / AA E / AA E / A D B / A E
E A E A / E A D / E BB / E
E / A B A / D A E / A D B / A E
E / A E A / DD B / A E A / A

Two-note syllables there are one-chord except at ends of 1st and 3rd line.

25A; D / D / G / AAA D / A
A / DD AA / DD GG / DD AA / D
D / G / D / B / D
A DD E A / A E B A / DD AA / D

25B; FF C / F C / FFF B
C G / C / F / C F
B be C F / F C F / C / F

25C; E / EE B E / E / BB F B / E
E / E B A E / A EEE / B EE B / E
E / E B A E / A / EE B E / B
E / E A E B / E B EE / B EE B / E

Tune variations: 2nd line word “His,” up three notes from E to A, with A chord instead of E chord. Last line, similarly, syllable “ti-“, up from E note to A note, with B chord instead of E chord.

25D; F / B / F / F B F
C F / C / F BB / F
D# G / B G / F brought C F / F C /F

Q: D#? A: Maybe plain D; # means, on my accordion, D above (to the right of) C rather than D below (left); D in the direction of the # chords rather than D b or D in the direction of the b chords.

26A; G / G / G / G D / G
C my G / C D / G / D / D
D C / D / G C / D / G

26B; E / EE A E / E A EE
B / E B / EEE B
B AAA / EE B E / E

27A; AA G# / A / A G / A
D A / B / E / A / A
A / D B / A shall E A / A E / A

Word variations: lst stanza: replace 1st two words with “Yahweh’s;” “shall” with “doth.” From last syllable of 2nd line through 3rd-from last syllable of last line, put “Jeho – vah so of whom am I.” 4th stanza, replace last four syllables of 1st line with “Jehovah craved.” 5th stanza, after 1st two syllables, put “Jehovah’s beauty may,” and in 2nd line, cut “may” and after “and” add “so.”
Q: Why? A: Because “Yahweh” (which is better Hebrew) or “Jehovah” (which is better English; compare Yeshua/Jesus) is a name, and the text appears to call for a name not just a title “LORD.” I cannot insist; the New Testament, when quoting the Old, does not.
Q: Do you always turn “LORD” into “Jehovah” (or “Yahweh”) when doing these Psalms? A: No, only when convenient.
Q: What about the Jehovah’s witnesses? A: That Jehovah is accurately described as triune, not as simply one all alone poor guy as unitarians (Arian heretics) claim, see my baptismal hymn and see the agreed basics in “improve churches.” Payoff includes that God was here in our FLESH (empathetic), not just way off in Heaven; that God saves us by action on EARTH and not just by a remote decree…”Well might the sun in darkness hide / and shut his glories in / when Christ the mighty Maker died / for man the creature’s sin” (Isaac Watts).

27B; C/ G C / C G / C
CC E / A / G / G / G
C G / C / Fb Up- A# G C / G / C

27C; C G / FF G F / B F C C Thou G
FF F art C G / C G Though C / F
G BB C I’m G / FF C up F B / F

27D; E / E LORD’s A B E A / B E / B E A E
B / E A E A with B / E B
F B E F / B E / AA B C
BB EE / AA E B / E B E

27E; D / A F# AA / D E DD
E throng A D / G D G A / D E A B
A E /A / AA D A / D A D
D / D G D A / D A / D

27F; D / DD AA / D / A B A E
A D / G A D G / D
G D AA / D / G A DD
D G A D / G A D / A / D

28A; E / E A B A / B E A E
B AA B / E / E B A B
E F B E / B AA B / E

28B; F C F B / F C FF / B F CC / F
F C F B / F C FF / B F CC / F
FF G C / F G C / G E FF / B C F
F C FF / B F C F / F B F C / F

29A; D / D G D / D A D / G AA / D
D / A E A / D E A / B D E / A
A / A E A / D / D great- G AA / D
D / G splen- D GG / AA D / G A D / D

29B; E B E B EEE / BBB EE
E B E B EEE / A B A B
B A E B EEE / BBB EE
E / B EE A B E / E B EE

Love that one.

30A; G / GG D G / G DD / DD G D / G
G / EE D E / E C E / A / D
C / GG D G / G DD / D D G D / G
G / EE D E / E CC / G D C D / G

30B; C / C / F CC / CC GG / C
C / C / F CC / GGG D / G
G / GG F God G F “I” G / C / GG F heal G F and G / C
C / CC F C / F / CC GG / C

Tune variations: at “over,” add a D note (three notes up; same chord) on 2nd syllable. Last line “the,” add a D note (two notes up; same chord). Thus both syllables changed have two notes.

Word variations: Change 1st four syllables to “Jehovah, I.” 3rd stanza 2nd line 1st five syllables to “Jehovah, you by;” last line, change the four syllables before “implore” to “Jehovah, I.”

I like that one a lot.

31A; E / EE A E BB / E
A / E / BB C# B
E B / E A / EE BB / E

Another note in my copy is “P” when one is a prayer, to be prayed to God and not just sung; and “P/2” if some of it is a prayer (addressed to God) and some not, as is often the case; and sometimes “not P” if none of the words seem to be said to God. 31 is “P” (or mostly so. (When I sing Psalm 31, I usually start with 31E and then move to the 2nd stanza of 31B, finishing up with C and D.)

31B; E B E A E / AA EE / E G# CC / B
C / F C B C / BB EE / B C B F / B
B / BB EE / AA EE / AA F -sar- B F / F B
B7 / EE B A / BB EE / BB E B / E

If not G# at least not Gb.

31C; G / GGGG D G / D / D
G / GGGG D G / C D
G A G D / G / CC G D / G

31D; F / F / B CC B / BB C B / B F
F / F / B CC B / BB CC / F
F / C / B FFF / CC GG / C
C / F / B CC B / BB CC / F

31E; D / DD GG / D / GG D G / A
A / DD GG / D / AA EE / A
A / D / GGG B / E / A
A / DD E D / G / DD AA / D

31F; G / GG F D / B on F GG / C F BB / D
D / EE FF / B bod- C B F / B E F D / G
G / BB F C / B F C / D G C B / D
G / GG F D# / B sin- D G C / B E F D / G

31G; C G / C A E C / F G G Be- F / GG F G / F C
C G / CCC G / G FF / CC GG / C
G C / GG C G / G C C Whose G / FF G F / C
C G / CCC G / G FF / CC G C / C

32A; F / F is B F / F man C C / F
C / C / F / F / F -gres- B F
F he B F / C / G / G is G C / F

32B; D / D / D A / G / G
D / D keep A / D / A / A / D / D A
G / G / D / A -com- G A / D / D

32C; G / GGG F / BB FF / GG C E / D
G / GG E F / B G DD / F B F C / G
G C / GG D G / CC G / G D G C -i- D G -qui- D / D
D / DD G E / A E C A De- D / GG DD / G

32D; G / GG D G / GG A you C C / GG A as F A / D [1st D: 2 notes, 1 chord, 1 syllable]
G / GG D G / GG A steps C C / GGGG D / G [Same]
G D / GGG C / GG AAA / D [Same]
G / GG D G / GG A hold C C / GGGG D / G

33A; E / E B EE / B D# EE {# OR AT LEAST NOT b}
B E B E / B F BB / BB F7 F / B
E / E / E / A / E
B E B D / EE AA / EE BB /E

33B; F / F B FF / C7 C B F
B C F C / F G CC / FF C G / C
F DD C G / CC FF
C F GG / C G CC / F BB C / F

33C; E / EEE B E B / E
AAA E B E / B / B F B F / B
E / EEEE AA / E
EEEE AA / E / AA E B / E

34A; A / AAA E / A / BB A E / A ( lines 1, 2 and 4)
E / A / E / A E BB / E (LINE 3)

34B; G / G C GG / GG D G / G / D
G / G / CCC G / GGG D / G
G / GG G lips D G / CCC G / G / D
G / GG G e- D G / CCC G / GGG D / G

34C; CC G / C G / CC G C / F /C F G
C G C G / C G / C / C / F C / F G C G
G / E C G / A E F G / C E / F F GG / C
G C G F / G C / F G / C G C F / C G / C

34D; GG C / D / GG A D / G / B E D
A C# / D A D A / D / GG C / DD / GG AA
B / E B D / A C# / D A D A / D / G E A / D G
A D GG / D / D G D / AA D G / A D / G

34E; E AA / E / AAA E _to B C
D G / A i C F will E / A E B E / B fear C B the A B
FF D / D G Cb / G Cb B A / B
B / E A D Cb/ Cb E G / G lips A F from B / A
A de- B AA / EE A E / A E -ing B / C
D seek E F C and F / EE B7 B7 / C all F C your F / B

Tune “bad and hard” imho. / Some quoted syllables may have capitals turned into lower-case (small) letters, e.g. the word “I” may appear as “i,” to avoid confusion with chords.

Pray 35A; FF C / F C D / C F C / F / F
B F who C / F C F / C / FF C / F C -ler D
C F of C / F / F / C F / C / F

35B; B / B out B E / F B / C B F / B F / B take F C
F in B F / C pit F C / F / E _out B E a F / C F
C F / B F in B / E which B F / B soul F B / C be B F / B

35C; B F B / F B / F B / F / B
E C / B charg- F F / B / F / B
E for F B / F / B / E C / B ill F F / B

*35D; C / F / C / G / G C G
C me C G / C G / C / C / F
D / G / G F G / C / F C their G / C

* Indicates that, according to what TBOPFS says, I THINK this tune–and any tune so marked–to be in the “public domain” (the composer died more than 75 years ago, i.e. before A.D. 1932), so I THINK this tune can be freely used without violating copyright. (If TBOPFS is wrong, or if I read it wrongly, or if I’m wrong about copyright law, watch out. And some tunes NOT *so marked may be in public domain; the book isn’t always clear about dates.)

*35E; AA E / A jus- E A / D Lord E E / A / E
A not B E re- D / E B / E / A / D A / E is A B de- D
A -voured E D / A E / A soul’s A A de- D / A-sire D -sire B E / A

Three chords on syllable “-sire:” ADB.

*36A; GD / G D / G D / D C / C AG
C E / A / G / D / G D / C G
C E / EC A / G / G D / G

*36B; E / E E B E / E E B E / A E D# D# / E
B E E A E / E A A A / A A B B / E
E / E B B B / B E E E / E D D D / E
B / E E A E / E A A F / F / [ABA trust ] B / E

*37A; C / C FD C C / D G C C
C G A D / G / C F G G
C DF G C / FG C G G / C

Chords together (FD, DF, FG) are on one syllable–hence more repetition and spreading out.

*37B; C / G C F C / G7 G C A / C G A E / A
G / C G C C / C C C A / G G D D / G
G / G G G FG / C / G G G FG / CG
C / C G C G / D C G G7 / C C C G / C

*37C; F / F C F F / C F C C / F F G G / F C
C / F C F F / BC F C C / F BG F C / F
C / C F C C / C F C C / F D G G / C
C / F B F C / B F C C / F BG F C / F

*37D; E / EE EA E AA / EE B E E
B C#E BF BF / B E AA AA E E
AF BB E E / AB EB E BB / E

*37E; F / F / F / C C G C / F
F / F / B B F G / FC C / F

Like that one.

*37F; E / E G# A E / B B E E
B E B E / B E / A E A E
E B E F / C F E B / E

Pray *38A; (note 3 staffs per line of words, as you see, not the usual 2.)
A E D E A E A E / A E A E
E E A A E E D / A A E A D E
A E / A E D A / A A E A D E D

Tune variation: after the last D chord (F note), throw in an A chord (E note) on the last syllable, to update the tune from the A.D.1600s to the A.D. 2000s. (I think 38A and 14B were the last two tunes I worked through in this book in A.D. 1992–I didn’t work tunes in order the first time.)

Pray *38A, B, C (all of which I like, esp. C).

*38B; F F F F C7 F / BC7 F / F F F F F C7 / C7
F B F F F F / FB F / C7 / F

*38C; G D C G / D C C G / G / A A D
G D C G / D C C G / G C A AA / G D G

*38D; C / F F F C / C C C GC / G C G
C / F F F C / C C G C / F G C

*39A; F F C / F / B F F C / F
F D G / C / F C C G / C
F / C F / F F G G / C
F E B / B E F B / F C / F

*39B; A BB / E / A B E B / E
E A E / A E / A B E F / B
E BB / E / E A C C / B
B E B / E B E B / E B / E

*40A; G / G G G D / C C C D
G G D G / GD / G G G C
G / A D G D / G

40B; G / G G GA GG / C C CG GG
G C GD GG / D BD / G D G AD
E B A GD / G AG G D / G

40C; F / F G F GC / FC FB C D / B FF C7 C / F
(same as first line)
FF / C G CC DC / FC FB C C / F F B FB /C
(SAME AS FIRST LINE)

40D; E / E E B E / A A E B
E E C C / F / F F B F
E E A E / A EA E B / E

40E; F / AG G / A C / GD B / F C / F C
F G G / C / A C / GG C / B / D
G / F / B / BC F / F G / BC
4th line = 2nd

40F; E / E A E B / E / A A E E / B
B / E E C B / E / AB E B B / E
E B B F B / EFE E / A A E E / B
B / E A E B / E / A A E B / E

41A; A / A E E A / E D E A / A A B E / A
A / C C B F / B B E E / F B E B / E
E / E E D E / A E A A / A F B B / E
E / A C B F / B F D D / A A A E / A

*41B; FC / FBF CF / FC F / GF C / F FB
FBF BF / CGC G / C / CF CF / F
FFBF / BF / FC C / F / BBFC FC / F

41C; F C F C / F B / F C C F
C F / BBF B / F / FF7 B
F / BC / C / F

Book 2, Psalms 42-72

*42A; A / E A / D E / A
A / A B / E / D D A / E B
E B / E / E A D / A E / A

*42B; E / B / E / A / E B
E B / CB F / B / B / B / E
EB C / B / E / B / E / E

42C; D D A / D / G / D A / D A
D A / B E / A / A D D / A D / A / D
D D A / D / G / D / D A / D
G / D / A D D / A D / A / D

*43; A / A A E7 E7 / A E A E?
A A E A / E7? / A
D / A A A E / A

*44A; F / F F FF CC / F F C C / FF BG F C / F
2ND LINE = 1ST
F / B / F C F F / C C F C / FC
3RD LINE = 1ST

*44B; F / F C F F / G C F F
B F F G / A# F / F B C A# (remember “#” on accordion means above C, not necessarily sharp)
G C F F / C G G C / F

44C; E C C B B / C CD G D / G C AC B / E
2ND LINE = 1ST
G / G G GD GC / G GC D C / A A B B / C
C / G G GD GD / C CD G D / G C AC B / E

?44D; E / AA E E / A / AA D B / E A
A EB E B / EE A B / E B E / E
E / AA E E / A / AA D B / E A (3RD LINE = 1ST)
A / A / D / A E A / A

The “?” means I don’t know if this tune is covered by copyright or not. (* means I THINK it is NOT covered. Nothing, as at 44C above, means I think it IS still under copyright protection.)

*44E; E / E A E / C F F / E B B / E
E / A B B / E B B / E F F / B
B / E E A / E C C / B E B / E
B / E E7 E / C F F / E B B / E

?44F; E / A E B7 / E E B7 / EA B7 B7 / E
B7 / E A B7 / A E E / EF E F / B7
B7 / B7 / A E E / AB7 A B7 / E
B7 / E B7 B7 / EE B7 B7 / E B7 E / E

*45A; E / A A E E / A / D D E D
A / E A E E / A E A A
D D A E / D D B B / A E / A

Since this one repeats a line of words, I usually omit the third line of words and sing only the 4th, to sing it only once.

*45B; CG / C / C
G C G D / C CG / C
GG CD / G / C C C G / C

*45C; E / A / E E B E / B
B / E B A E / F CF B F / B E F F / B
B / E E B E / A C / F F E E / B
B / E F A E / A B E E / A E B B / E

*46A; C / C / G G G C7 / G G F G / C G
G / C / G / A G D D / GDG
G / C C G C / F G G C / G G F G / CF
C / F / C / F F C G / C

46B; A / A A A E / A E A A / D A D E / A
A / A A A E / A E A A / E E A B / E
A / E C E E / A E A C / F C B B / C
E / A A DE AE / A E A D / A A D E / A

*46C; C / C C GD E / CG DD G
C / E D C D / FA G C
C / C C GD E / CG DD G
C / E D C D / FA G C
C / C A G D / G C
G C F G / C E / C G
A DD / G D / D C A G / E
C / E D C D / FA G C

47A; D / D D D G / A A D D / A A E E / A
D D D D GB / A A D A / G EA D F# / G
A / D A G A / D G D D / G D G G / A
A / D B G D / A DA D D / G G A A / D

*47B; G / G / C // D / G D / G A / D
D / D G / G // C / G A / G D / G

*48A; D / D G A D / G G D D
D A E E / A D / D G A A
G G D D / G D A A / D

*48B; B / B / F F F B / B B F F / B
B / E / B / E / B
B / B B B F / B G G G / E F / B

*49A; F C / B F / B FF / C / F / [A above F on accordion] F / B C / F
F C / B F / B FF / C / F / CC DG / F C / F

*49B; B A# / B / B F / B / B C
BF B / C / F / B A# / B / D
G / CA A / BF B / B F / B

*49C; same as 49A.

*50A; B / B / B / F
DG FC / F B / B / B
EB EFB / F B / EF BE / B F / B

*50B; G / G G G DG / D GD
G DG CD G / D / G G D D
GD GC D G / C GC G D / G

*50C; A / A A A E / A / E E D E / A
A / D D D E / A / B B A E / A
A / E E B E / A / A A B F / D
D / A E A A / F A D D / A A A E / A

*51A; A / A D A E / D
A A EA E / A / E A EA E
A A BD D / AA A EA E / A

51B; D / D D A7 D A7 G / D / A7 D A7 A7 / D
D / D D A7 D A7 G / D / A7 / D
D / G G G G A7 G / D / A7 A7 G A7 / D
D / G G A7 G G G / D / A7 / D

?51C; C / C / F / FG F / C
C / C / G / C / C
F / C / G / GC G / C

*51D; B E / B B B E / B B C / B F B F / B
F B / F / B F B / F / B
B E /B B B E / B B C / B F B F / B

*51E; E E B E / A A E / E A B E / B B E
E E B E / A AA E / E E B B / C FF B
E E B E / A A E / E B E A / E B E

*51F; G / G / GD G / D / G E / D G
DG D / G / D / G / DG D / G
G / G / D G / D / G / G
GD AA / D / G E / D G / DG D / G

*52A; D / D A D D A A / DD D
G / D / A A A A G A
D / G GG D AA / D

52B; G E / B G F C / A D G / G E / B C F B / D C
C F / E B F C / B / B C7 / G G G D / G
B F / B B F B / FF B / B F / B B F B / F B
C F / E B F C / G / G C / D C G D / G

So bad it’s interesting (sbii).

*53; c / c g c f / c
c g d d / g c / c g c c
f g c g / c f c g / c

?54A; B / B EF / B / E EF / B
F / B / F / F / B EF / B
EE EC / B FF / B CC / B E F / B / B

54B; F FCA C F / C7 CC7C BB F / F EAD CC B / BB C F
2nd = 1st (thank God)
A AEA E E / B BEB C7 C / F FCA B E / A BBB C
D DEB C F / C7 CC7C BB F / F EAE AE B / BB C F

55A; G / G G G C / G D D D
D D D G / G / G
C / G G D D / G

55B; C / C G / C / G C G / C / G C / A G D / G
G / G / D / F / CG G / C / GC G / C
C / C A / AE A / G A E / A E / C EA / A B / E
C / C / GG D / D F / CG G / C / G C G / C

*55C ; A / AA E / A / E / A
B / E B / E / AA E / A
D / A / B / EA E / A

56; C / F C B BB / E FF F F / D C B E / A
B / A DA E B / E FF F F / F E BB E / F
B / A DF E B / E FF F F / D E AF E / F

*57A; G / G D G G / C D G G
C D G G / D G / G D G G
A E C C / C A G D / G

*57B; G / C / G / F G / C
G C / GG DD / G C / C G
C / C / G / C GF / C G / C

*58A; F / F C F F / C F C C / F F G G / F C
C / F C F F / BC F C C / F BG F C / F
C / C F C C / C F C C / F D G G / C
C / F B F C / B F C C / F BG F C / F (Last C noted as “Cb”?)

*58B; F / F C FB A / C FD A D / AE A EE FD / A
A / A A B AD / E B A D / AC AE D C / F
A / E / FD EB EE AD / E DB C FC / A
C D E / F F F BB / C B / E A ED C / F

*59A; G / A A D D / G G D A
D D A E / A D / G G D DA
G F G D / A G D A / D

*59B; C / C G C C / F CF C C
FG C G C / G / FG C C
G C G G / FG C GG CG / C

*60A; E / E E A E / B B E E
A A B F / B E / A A E A
E B E B / E A E B / E

60B; A / A GA D A / A E A A / D ED A A / E
A / A GA D A / A E A D / A EA E DE / A
A / D D C C / F D D D / A / E
E / A GA D A / A E A D / A EA E DE / A

Pray 61; E / E E B E / E A A A / B B G# B
D# E E EA / B B B F / B
B B C C / C B B A / B
B E E A / A F E B / E

*Kendra Slater Allen has a nice tune for 61 (and one for 51D.)

*62A; F / FC F / BF F / F / F
F / FC F / C / C F / FC F / BF B
F / F / DG C / F C / F / F

62B; B B B7 / B B C / F G A / G
G C F / C G / A C / F / B B B7
B B C / F G A / G / G C F
C G / A C / F / G C F / C A G G
G F B B / F / B C F / C A G G
G F B B / F / B B7 B C / F G A G
A A G C / G / G G C C
F F C C / G G G7 A / D
Tune “sbii” (so bad it’s interesting) imho.

*62C; D / D A / D G / DA GA / D / G
A GA / DD AA / D / A / E A / DG A
E EB / A / D / G D / A AE / D

*Pray 63A; D7A7 / D D D7 D / G D D A7D
A7 D D A7 / A7D DD / D D G7 G7
G D D D7D / A7 A7 D A7 / D
On the last line, instead of notes eedef, I use egfed. Same chords. One of my favorites (not just for the tune but for what the words say.)

63B; G / G / G D G D G C
D / D B D B D / G
G / G D G D G C
D / D B D B D / G
D / D D A D D A / D G D
D / G G C G G C / G C G
G / D G G A A / DG
D / G G D B D / G

*64A; C / A C G D / E A E E / A E A G / C
C / C C G C / G D E A / A C G E / F

*64B; D A / E A D D / A A D / A D / G F# A E D
A A D / D A / E A D D / A A D / A D
G FA E D / A A D / D G D D F D / E E A
D G D D F D / E E A / A D / A A D C
C B E / D / G D EA D / A A D

*Pray 65A; F / B / E / B B F B / F
F / B / E / B B B F / B
F / F F B F / F F G / E G G C / BF
F / B / E / B B B F / B

*65B ; F / F F B7B7 C7 B7 F F / C7 F C7 C7 / F
C / F F B7 C7 / B7B7 F F / C F C7 C7 / F
C7 G / C7 F C7 C7 / F C7 C7 / FG7 C7 D7 G / C7
C F7 F7 / B C7 / B7 F F / C7 F C7 C7 / F

*66A; A / A D A E / A EB E E / DD ED A E
A AE / D D A E / A BB E E / A
A / AEEE E / AA D / A E / A

I skip the fourth line of words to avoid repeating it (the Bible doesn’t repeat it.)

?66B; EB / E E EB EA / E B E EA
E E AE BE / EB B / BB EB E B
EB EF B E / A AA BB EB / E

*66C; D / A F D D G G / D D / G A
D A B E / A D / G D G D A / D
D / A F D D G G / D / G A
D A B E / A D / G D G D A / D
A D / A D / G D A D / G D A D
G D A D / D F G D G D / A D

*67A; E / E E E A / E / B7 E B7 E / EB7
E / E E E A / E E B7 / E C B7 F / B7
B7 E E B E / A E B7 / E E B7B7 E / EB7
E / E E E A / E / B7 A E B7 / E

*67B; C / C C G C / F G F / C C D G / C
2nd line same as 1st
C / C A C EA / E A A / C A F D / E
C / C C G C / F G F C / C C D G / C

*68A; G / G / AC D / G / CG C
G / D / D / D / D / D
GC G / CA D / G / CG C / G D / G

?68B; G / D / G
D G D D / G / G D D DD
D G G GG / E A C DD / G

68C; D / D A G D / G D A D / D A D A / D
D / A D A D G A / D A G / G D A D / A
A / D A G D / G D A D / D A D A / D
D / D A A E / A E A D / A E A E / A
D / D A G D / G / E E A G / A
D / D A G D / G D A A7 (or C#) / D G D A / D

68D; F / F C F C / F B F B / F F B C / F
2ND LINE = 1ST IN CHORDS
F / B CB C F / CB C F C / F F C G / C
C / F F C C / F F B B / F F B C / F

?68E; EB / E E EB EA / A B B EB
E E B B / EB BB / E E EB EA
A B B BB / EB EB E B / EB
B / EA BA / E B / E

*69A; DA / D / G D / D / A
D / A / D / AG D / D AD
A D / A DA / D G / D A / D

I use 69A, which I like, for 69B too. The last note of 69A I make a D instead of an F, so it ends by going down instead of up. (If you want to add a repetition, repeat the last line of words: the first time as published, the 2nd time with D instead of F.)

*69B; C / C / C / G / C / C
F / C G / C / C / C / C
G / C / G / C / F G / C

*69C; A / A E D A / E D E BE / A C G# B / E
E / C C B C / F C A B / A A E E / A
E / E D E E / E D E E / E D E E / E
A / A E D BA / D A B B / A A E E / A

Remember, # indicates above C on accordion; not necessarily sharp (just not flat).

?69D; F / F C F F / F C F BC
B / F / C C F D#
A# C G G / F F C F F

*69E; DA / D / G / DD DA / D DA
D AD / A E / A / A DA / D / G
DD DA / D G / D DA / D A / D / D

p*70A; G / G EbC B D# / E B / G BC B F / B
B / F B F E / B EE D# D# / E C C D / G

p or P = pray (the words are a prayer, sung to God.) Psalm 69 is mostly prayer. P applies to the whole psalm; I don’t do it for sections (tho you are welcome to.) If a song is a prayer, point out that it’s a prayer so the singers are reminded to talk to God, and that they are talking to God.

p*70B; A / A E7 A D / A / E7 A E7 A / E7
E7 / A E7 A E7 / A D A A / E7 A E7 E7 / A

70C; F F A G C A / A
G G G C C / F / G G D D G G
A A / G C D G E / A

P*71A; E / B / E / AE B / E
A E / E A / B / B / AA B / E A
E A E / A B / EE A / EA B / E EAA / E

71B; D / D G A D / GA G A A
D F# G G / B# / G A D D
A G F# D / D D G A / D

*71C; G / G G G D / C / G G GD G / D
D / G G G D / C / G G D G / G
GC / G C G GG / G D G D / G C G G / D
D / G G G D / C / G G D G / G

*71D; B / B / BF B / EB F / FB B
FB F / BB BE / BF F / BB F / BB F
BF B / BF BB / EE CC / FC FF / B

*72A; C C G / C / F G / C G / C G
FC DC / FG C / G / G D / G
G7C GD / G / C / GF CG / C G / C

*72B; G / D G D G / G G D G
D G C G / G D G G / G G C D
G A D D / G G C G / G D G

*72C; G / G / GD GD G
G / G / GD GD G G
C C G G / D D G G / C C G G
D D G G / C C G G / D D G

72D; E E B B / E / A A B B
E A E / A A F F / BEB
E B F F / E B E E / A / A E E
E F C C / AC F F / E B B / E
“The prayers of David son of Jesse have been ended” (see a Bible.)

Book III, Psalms 73-89

*73A; E / E E E B / E E A E
A A E B / E / E B E F / B
E / E E B F / B E E E
E E E B / E E A E / A A E B / E

*73B; C / C G / C / GC G / C / F
C / CG C / G C / C G / C / GC G / C
C / F / C / CG C / G / G / C
CG C / CG GG / CG F / C G / C G / C

73C; D / D D D A7 / D D G D
G G E7 E7 / D / A7 A7 D A7 / D
B / E7 / A D D D
D D D A7 / D D D7 D / G G D A7 / D

?74A; A / A A A D / D A A A / A E B E
A / A A D A / A E E A
D A B A / E A / D D A E / A

74B; B / EFB E / BF BF / B / F BE
F C / F / F / B / EC C / BF
B EBE F / B F / B F / BB EE / B F / B

75; C / C / C G G G
G G F G / C / C G C C
G F F F / C C G G / C

*76A; C G C C / C F G G / C GF G C
D G C / C G C C / C F G G
C GF G C / D G C / C C G G
C C E# E# / F F C C / G G C
Why they didn’t use the tune named “Castle Boro” for that one, as the 1927 Psalter Hymnal and the Christian Reformed Church’s 1983 (?) Psalter Hymnal did, I do not know.

*76B; B / G D B D / E F D D / D G F F
D G E D / G / G D B D / E F DD
D B F F / D E E D / G D / B F B B
C F B B / F B FD EF / B F E

*77A; D D D G D / A D A A
D D E G / A / G A A D A
D / A E D A / D

?77B; C / C C7G C G / C GG C C / C F C C / G
G C C7G C G C C / F F C G / C
CE / F F C GC / G G C C / A A G D / G
FG / CA GF C C / F CG C C / F F C G / C

*77C; B / B / E / B F / B
F B / GF C / F / B F / B
EF B / F B / B / B F / B

*78A; D / D A / D / A G / G / D / D A / D / D
D / D A / D / A G / G / D / D A / D / D
D / D / AA G / G D / D / A EA / A E / A / A
line 4 = line 2. I sing most of Psalm 78 to this tune, since I don’t care much for the other tunes except 78E and 78F. I also use 78A in some other places.

*78B; F / F F C B / B B F C
F C C G / C F / B F B F
C G A F / C B B C / F

*78C; F / B FC F B / B FE F B / EF B C F / B
/ / / EF BE B F / B (the rest is same as 1st line)
BF / B F B E / F FB F BF / B F B E / F
4th line same as 2nd

?78D; E / E A E E / F A E A
E B E BF / B / E A E E
B F B E / E A E B / E

?78E; E / E E B B / E A E E / B / E
E / E E B B / F / E E BA B / E
E / B B BA E / E / B B E E / B
B / E E B B / E E AA A / E E BA B / E
In the 3rd line, between the last two notes (they’re Gs) with E chords, I sometimes interpose a B note (E chord), making the 1st of the E-chord syllables take two notes: “mi-ind,” “la-and,” etc.

*78F; G / G / G / DG D / G D
GD G / C G / D G / G / G
D G / C GD / G / D / G

*79G; A / A E / DE A / BA E / A
E / DE B / E / AD E / DE A
ED B / AE E / EE A / BA E / A

*78H; A / D E A A / D E A A
E E B B / E / E A E A
A D A A / D AD A E / A

Pray *79A; E A E / B / E B / E B
B C# (G) E (C) / (E) FF / B / EB C#
F / BAB B / E / B / B / E
The chords in (parentheses) apply if you use three flats instead of four sharps. (I’ve never taken music theory, but I’ve noticed that MOST of the chord LETTERS are the same–A, B, C, etc–if I play 3 flats for 4 sharps, or vice versa; or 5 flats for 2 sharps or vice versa: 7, minus the number of sharps, equals the number of flats. Of course it’s A flat chord instead of A sharp chord, etc.)

79B; D / D / G / GA G / D
D / AD A / D / D / G
GA G / D G / D G / D / A / D / D
Or, especially on last stanza, replace the last A note (A chord) with the C above it (still A chord), and the last D note (D chords) with the D note just above the new C; so the piece ends by going up instead of down.

Pray *80A; D / D D D A / D D D A / D
D / A D A A / A D D D / A
D / D D D A / D D D G / D
D / G D E E / A B A E / A
A / D D A D / G / D
D / A D A D / G A D A / D

*80B; B B G D / B C C D / C C GG F E
F D C / B B G D / B C C D
C C GG F E / F D C / C F C G
F C C D / B F B F B / D G D
EG C GC / C D C D G / D
C / GG F E F D / C

*81A; C / B C F B / F CF C C
FG CF C G / C / B C F B / F CF C C
FG CF C G / C / D D C G
F D G B / FDC FC / F C / F

*81B; C / C C G G / C / G
C F C G / C / C / C G G G
G / C / C
C / F / C C G G / C
As a variation, on the very last stanza, use the notes of the very last G-chord for the previous
G-chord also, moving it up two notes.

*82; F B / C7 F F F / BC7 F F C7
F C7 F G / C7 F C7 / B F B F
C7G A G C7 / F B C7 C7 / F

PRAY *83A; A / A / A / E A A E / A
2nd line = 1st = 4th
A / E A E E / A E A A / E A E AA / AE
(“Pray” applies to the whole psalm, remember.)

*83B; F / F / BC F / BF C / F CC / FB C / FG C / F
FC / FF B / FC F / BFC F / FC C / BBB F / BCF C / F

83C; G G F / B F B B B B / F B B B F
B B F D D D / G G G G F / B
F B B G D / B B F D D D / GG D B F
B B B B F B / C CD D B F / B
B F B / DD B D G / B G G G G B
E D G G D / B B F B D B / G
I love that “an-ni-hi-LA-ted” in stanza 3.

Pray *84A; E / E / E / EA A / E / EB E / BE B
E / B / E / E / B / E B (Part of 2nd B is doubtful)
EB E / BC B / E B / E B / BE B / E
EE A / E / AA F / EB E / B / E

*84B; C / C / F F C C / C D G GC
G D G G / G G C C / C C D D
C D C D / C D C C / C C F F
D D G G / C F C C / G C C
As a variation, at the end of the last stanza make “trust” into two syllables–spread it over two notes
, the first as printed, the 2nd a B note (middle line of treble clef) with B chord; hold to that note for “in,” and come down only to E note and E chord for the last word. (B and E notes MAY be flatted.)

*84C; G / G D / G // D / G / D G / D
D / F# A / D // G / C A / G D / G

*85A; E E B7 / E / B7B7 EB7 / E / E A A
E / E / B7B7 B7F7 / B7 / E E A / B7 B7E
E EB7 / B7 / EB7 E E / A E / B7 / E

*85B; D / D / A
A A G A / D / D D G D
G / D D A A / D

Pray 86A; EA / E B E / B B E / B E B / E
E B B / E E F / B / E E A / E
A A B / A BA / E / B / E

*86B; A / A E A / A E A / D E D / A
D / A / E / A E A / E A A
D E D / A / A A E / A E A / A

*87; C / C C F C / F G C G
C F G D / G / G G C G
C C F G / C C D G / C

*88A; G G D / G / D G G D / G GA D A
D / A G D A / D / D C D / G D
G A A F / EB / D G D / D G A D / G D / G

*88B; A A F / A / D E D E / A / A A E
B / B / E / E A A / E D
E E A E / A / A C A / D / E E D A / A

?89A; F F C / F C F C / F F C F
C / F F F C / F F C F
B / FCF C / F

*89B; FC / F C F GF / C F C C / F F BF B / F
FB C C F F / B F C FC / FB C F C / F
G A D D C / G A D F / C G C G / C
C / F C D AD / CC F C FC / FC F F C / F

89C; G / C D G G / A B C D
D G C G / C G / C D G G
C D C C / B A D A / D
D / A C AD G / G D A B
E E BB A / A E / D E A AD
G A G BE / A / CD E / G

*89D; A / A B E E / A E A E
A A A B / E / A E B C
B B E E / AE DD A E / A

*89E; F / F D F C / BB C F C / B CF E FC / F
E / A D A E / AD E A D / A BD B AE / A
A / ED C F B / CC7 C B A / B EE7 BB ED / FC
4th line = 1st

89F; G / G G AA GG / C C CG GG
G C GD GG / D BD / G D G AD
E B A GD / G AG G D / G

*89G; E / A A B E / C D G G
C G D D / G / G C D G
A G D G / A A A B / E

*89H; G / G / G D G G
D D D G / D G / G B E G
C G C CA / G A G DD / G

89I; C C G C / G / C / C D / G C / G D / G

Book 4, Psalms 90-106

PRAY*90A; A / A D / A AE / A E / A / A / AB B / E / E
E / A E / A / D A / E A / AD AE / A E / A / A

*90B; A E A / A / DA D / A
D E A / B / E / E A E / A D
C / B / A / E / A

*90C; G D G / GD G / AA D / G / C D C / G / A / D
same / / / / / / DG D / G
C / G / D / G / G D G / C / D / G

*90D; E E B / C F / E B / E / B E B / E F / G D / E
B F B / E / EA E / A / CF E / E B / B E A / B
E / D / ED E / A / A E B / E / E A / E

91A; F C / FC F / BC F / CG C / F C / F / CG C / F
2nd line same
F / DC D / B C / CF C / FA D / FB F / FC F / C
F / C / F / CFC FC / FC F / BF B / FAD C / F

*91B; tune “Just as I am”
EB / E / EB E / BE B / E / BB E
B A / A E / E EB / E / EB E / A
AB A / E / EB E / B / B / E

*91C; E / E B E A / E B E E / E B E B / E F B
E / A E E B / E A B G / F B E B / E B E

*91D; tune “Jesus, thy blood and righteousness”
B B F / B F / FG F / B / C F E
F / DGF C / F B / B / EF E / B
GC E / F / EB C / BF / B

?92A; EB / E E E EB / E A E EE / B B F B / E
EB / E E E EB / E A E EE / B B A B / E
E / A A AA BA / E / B B F B / E
E / A A AA BA / EE EB / E E E B / E

92B=92A (perhaps my favorite)

*92C; D / D D A D / D A / G D A D / A
D D B A / E E E D / A E / A D / G A / D
D / A D G D / G A D E / D A / D

*93A; C C F / C G / C C F G / C F / C
C C G / C F F G / C C C F / C G / C

*93B; B / F B / E // E / F B / C F / B

*94A; tune “Glorious Things of Thee are spoken”
F C F C / C F CC F / B F C F / G FF C
2nd = 1st
C F CC C / C F CC C / C BC F F / G G C
F F G F / B F CC F / C C7C FB BG / F C F

94B; G C / G G C D / C E D A B
C D G AA / D B D / A E D D
G D A A / B C D D / G

*95A; F F C / F / CF C / F / C FF / B F / C
C / F / B / F CC / F / FB C / F C / F

*95B; B / B B F F / B F B B / E / B
F / B F B F / C G F F / B CC B F / B

95C; F / F B / B E A / E B / B / B E A E
G G F / F / D F B A / E D C / F
A / E A E / B E / E F / F F B A
B / E / A B B / E B B B / E F / F

*96A; tune “All hail the power of Jesus’ name”
C / F / C F C F / C F F C
F C / F C F F / FC FC F C
F C / G CG / C F / C F F F
CG CF C F / F B / FBC C / F

*96B; EA / E A E B7 / A A E AB7 / A B7 E A
B7 / E A E B7 / E F B7 EA
B7 B7 C F / B7 E / A B7 B7 C
B7 B7 E EB7 / E A B7 B7 / E

*97A; E B7 B7 / E B7 / E B7 / E B7 (all Bs here B7)
EB F7E / B F / B E / E / E
A7 B / B / EA7 EB / E B / E

*97B; C C F / CGC C / F G / C / G G C
GDG D / G / CGC C / CGC C / FGC G
CG C / CGC C / G / C

97C; E / E B / G B E B / B E
A / E / B E B E / B
E / E B / G B E B
B E E / B / B F / B
B / B B E B / E / A / A E
E / B B G B / E / B F / B
B A B / E A / A E A E
B F / A A F / E B / E

*98A; G G C / GCGCG C / GG DD
G / D G D G / D / GDGCG C
D A / D / G D D / GDG G
CG DG / D / G A B G
C / G / D
GDGG / CGD G / D G

*98B; G / A D G
G G C C / D D G / G G D B
A A B7 B / A C G G / C D G

*99A; E / E / FB F / EB E / EB E
A B / EB F / B / EA A / EB E
AB E / FB B / E / AE B / E

*99B; E / E EB E A / E B E E
A A BB AE / EB B / E B EB E
AE BE A A / EBE A E B / E

*99C; tune “The God of Abra’m praise”
A / F C A B / C A / B F D E / A
C / A E A D / A E A D / A EE / A
A / A C F A / E AC / FC FB A D / C
C / F C A E / A BF D CC / B C / F

*100A; G / G D G7 G / G D G G
G G D G / C G D A / D G D G
C D G G / G C D CD / G D G

*100B; G / G D / GDG G / GCG D / G
A D / GAG D / G / GDG G / CFC C
DED G / D / GD G / CG D / G

100C; D / D / D A A / D
G G A A / D / D D E D
A C# A / B EE / A / A
A E A / D / D / B# / B# F#
B / C / C / E / A //
E / A / D D G G G
D / G / G / E / E
A / A / D / D / D
D / G / E / A
D / D / G G A G / A G A / D

*101 ; tune “The Church’s one Foundation”
E / E E A E / E B E / A A E B / E
B / E F E B / B A E / A B E E / B
B / E B E A / A E E / E G C C / B
B / E E A E / C F F / F F E B / E

*102A; E / E A A A / B B B E / B B E B
E / A A E E / E
A A E E / B B B E / A F E B / E

*102B; G / GD G / AG D / G / G
GE D / DD AA / D / D / G
D / G / G G E / D / D
G / G / GD G / AG D / G

*102C; G / G G C D / G G C C
G G G D G A / D / G D G D
G G7 G D7D / C C G G D D
G / C7C DC G G / G D G

*103A; tune “Love Divine, all loves excelling”
B B E B / B FB F B / F E E E / B FF B
B B E B / B FB F B / E E B B / F EF B
B C C D / G DG D G / B B E B / F CC FF
4th line = 2nd

103B; B G / Eb B / B / E F / B E / B BE / F CC / F
B G / E B / B / B F / B / E / B F / B

8103C; E E A E / B E E B / E B E B / C FF B
B E E E / A F E B / E E F A / E B E

?103D; E A EA EA / E A EA E
E B F BE / B FF B / BE BE B B
EB EB E E / EE AE EA EB / E B E

*104A; TUNE “O Worship the King”
A / A A E / A / D E A / E
A A / A A E / A D / AD A E / A
A / A A B / E E A
E E A / E
A / A A E / A A D / AD A E / A

104B; E / E B A / E / E A B / E
E / B B F / B E / A B F / B
B / E E B / B A A / C / B
B / E A E / E A A / E E B / E

*104C; A / A FB AE / A E / A DD AE / A
AE / A E B / AE A / BA D A / AE
E / B A DE / AA A E / A E A / E
A DE A E / A D A / B A E / A

104D; G / G / D / D / G
2nd = 1st
G / D / G / C D G / D
G / G GD GD / G / C G D / G

*104E; G / G G C / G / G G C / G
G / C C D / G / D D A / D
D / D G G / G D G / C G C / G
G / E# C C / D G G / A G D / G

*105A; E / E A / E / E B / E B / E B / F
B / B E / EB A / E / BE A / B / E B
E B / EA / E / AF E / E B / E / E

*105B; BF / B / E E E B / B F BE BB / F
BF / B / F E E E / B B BF BF / B

*105C; G / G G G D / G G G D / G / D
D / G G G D / C / G G G D / G

105D; E / E F EB FB / B B7 E B / E E EB EB / A
E / E B FB FB / EB F C B / E F FF EF / B
B / A / B B E B / A G# F E / A
B / E B FB FB / E A E B / E E CF EB / E

*105E; C / C G C F / C G C C
F C G D / G / C G C F
C G C F / C C G G / C

*106A; B / B F B B / E F E E
B F B B / F / B F B B
F E E EE / B B F F / B

?106B; G / G D G D / G C G G
G D G G / D / G G G D
C / G G G D/ G

?106C; F / C F C F / C C F F
C F F GG / C F / C F F B
C C F F / G G F C / F

?106D; B / B F / B / F E / B
F / F / B / B F / B F
C / F A# / B / B F / B

*106E; E / E A A G / D D G G / D D A A / B
G / E G D A / B B E C / E D A B / E
C / C D C C / G C D D / G D C A / B
G / C C D D / G G D GB / E D A B / E

*106F; G / G / G D7 G G / A7 A7 G D7 / G
G / G / G D7 G G / D7 D7 A7 A7 / D7
G / C7 G D7 G / D7 / G G D7 A7 / D7
D7 / G / G D7 A7 G / A7 A7 G D7 / G

106G; G G D D / G / A C D C
G / DG D / GD G D G
DG D / GD G C7 / CC C7
C G / G D / C / G / D / G

Book five, Psalms 107-150

Psalm *107A; D / D / D / D A / A / A D
AD A / D / D / D / G / GA
A D / AD A / D / G / D / AD A / D

107B; D A A D D / A A D A
D A E E / A / D AG A D
A B A A / D DA E A / D

*107C; E / E / B
A A A B / E B / E B E E
E A E E / E E E B / E

*107D; tune “There is a fountain filled with blood”
c / c f c f / f f c cc / c c fc cc / g
C / C F C F / F F C CG / C C G C / C
CG / C C G C / F / C C FC CC / G
4th line = 2nd

*107E; GD / G C G DD / C A C C / G G G AA / GD
” / ” / ” / G G D GD / G
DA / D D D GD / G D G DG / D D A DA / D
4th line = 2nd

Pray 108A; D / D DA D G / D
GG AG D A / D / D AG D A
DA DG D D / G G A AA / D

108B; F / B F C A / GFB F / B F B E / F
F B C G G / G C F B / F B C C / F
F / B F B F / F / B E F GG / F
F / B C7 G B / F F C D / G C B F / B

*108C; D A A / D A D / G A A / D
D G D7 D7 / B E D / A A D / D A
D A A / D A D / G A A / D D D A
B B A G / A A DD / B E D A / D

Pray *109A; G D G G / DD G D D / G D A A / G D G
G D G G / DD G D D / 2nd = 1st
D G A D / D GD A A / D G D G / D G D
A D G G / DD G D D / G D A A / G D G

*109B; E B E B / E A B E
A E A E / B B E / E E B B
E A E B / A B E A / E B E

?109C; E / B B F B / E B A E / A E A E / B
E /E B F B / E B F B / F B C F / B
B / E E A E / E B B B / E E AB E / B
E / B B F B / E B AB E / A B E B / E

*110, tune “The Son of God goes forth to war”
(Ps 110 an NT and early church favorite–King David’s greatest hit?)
B / B F B B / E F F B / F B F B / FCF
F / B F B D# / D# C C E / B B F B / B
B / C C D D / G G E E / B B F B / FFB
F / B F B B / E F F B / B C B F / B

*111A; G / G DG D D / D D7D G G
C C CC DC / G / D GD G D
G / CC CA G D / G

*111B; E / E B / F / EE BB / F E
E / E B / E / E B / E
AB E / B / EE A / E B / E
If feeling energetic, throw in a B note (E chord, 3rd chord from end) after the G note.

112A; E / E B E B / E A E E / A E B E / B
B / E B E E / E A E C / B B F E / B
B / B G B B / E B E E / A A C C / B
B / E E B F / E E A BA / E E E B / E

112B; G / G / C C D7 C / G
D / G / D G D G / D GA / D
D / D / G DG / G / C
C / G G A E / C A G D / G

*113A; tune “Take my life and let it be”
G / G / G D / G / G E / EA CA
G DD / G / G / D DG / D G / DG / G
C G / DA CG / GD / G D / G CA / G D / G

*113B; C / C / F A / G
C / C C C D E / A G C F
G D D / G / G E G G
C F C A / G A G D / G / C

*114; E / E E A EE / E B E A
E EA E EB / EB E / A EB E BB
E B E A / E EB E B / E

*115A; E / E / BB E / E B / E A
EB E / EB E / E / B E / E A / E
E A / E / EA E / EB B / E / E

115B; A / A EA E E / A A D D / A E A E / A
2nd line = 1st
A / E A E E / A E A EA / E A E A / AE
A / A EA E E / A A D D / A E A E / A

*115C; G G C EA / G D GG / G B E GD
G D G / G G C D / GD GD GD
D G C BD / G D G / G C G CG
G G C / C E D GD / G D G

*115D; D / D A D / D D G D
A D A / D D D A / B D AE
A E A A / A EE A / D D G G
A A D / G D G D / G A D

*116A; E / E A E E / A E E E / B E B B / E
E / E A E E / A E E E / B / E
E / E / E A A A / B / EBE
E / E / E A A A / B / E

116B; F / F F B F / C C F F
F F B F / C / F F C F
B D C G / F G C C / F

*116C; E B B / E B / E B E B / E B
E E B / A E / B B E B / B
E E B / E B / E B E F / F B
E B F / B B E C / B F / B
B G B / E / A B B / E
E B F / E E A B / E B B / E

*117A; G / CAC G / GDG GD / GDG G / D G / GDG G / AG D / G
GC / G C / GCG GD / GGCD G / D G / CGD G / AG D / G

117B; B / B B F B / BF B / E E C C
FC F F F / E E F B E / F E F F F
B F F B B / F / B F F / B

*118A; C / C G C C F G / C / C F G D / G
C / C F C C F G / C / G G G FG / C
C / C C G F F F / C C / G G F G / C
C / C C G F F F / C / G G F G / C

*118B; D / D A D G / D AA D A
D DE A EE / A / A A D D
A D A DG / D DE D A / D

*118C; E / E EE A E / A BB E E
B E B F / B / E E A E
A DA B E / E AA E B / E

(Mostly) pray 119A; DA7 / D / G / D / D / G
A7 E7 / A7 E7 / A7 DA7 / D / G / D
D / A7 / D A7 / A7A7 E7 / A7 / A7 / G A7
D G / D / G A7 / GA7 E7 / A7 / D

*119B; tune “Jesus, thou joy of loving hearts”
F / F / C7 / F / F
B C7 / F C7 / C7 / C7 / G7 C7
G7 / C7 / F / B / F C7 / F

*119C; A / A A D D7D / E AB E AE
A DD A E / A / D E A E
A DD E D / A AD A E / A

*119D; D / D / D A / DD G / D
A / A / D / D / D / EA A
E / A / DA D / D A / D

*119E; E / E / A E / AB E / B
EF B / C F / B / B E / A E / A E
AB E / B / E / BE B / E / E

?119F; A AD A / AD A / DE D / A
AE A / AD A / E / A / AE A
D / A / AE A / BD E / A

119G; D A / D D7D / A D / A D / A GA
G / D / A / A GA / D E / A D
A D / A D / D G / DA A / D

*119H; CG / C F / C / FC G / GC C
G / AG D / G / G / C G / CG C
CG F / C CF / C F / CGC G / C / C

*;119I; BF / B / B / E / E
B / B / F / F BF / B / B
E / E / B / B F / B / B

*119J; C / C / C / FD G / C G
CC F / GG D / G C / F / C
F / C / C / FG G / C

*119K; A / E D A / AA G B / A E
A E A / A E A / EE B B / E
A / E D A / A / D
A A B / C A G / FF E E / A

*119L; F B F / B C / F F C / C F
F C / F C / F / F BC F
C F C / C C F C / F C / F

?119M; F / B / E / B B B BC / F
F / B / E / B B F F / B
B / F F F B F / B E B B / F G E GC / BF
F B B BF BF / E E CG EC / B B F F / B

?119N; F / F C C C / B F F F
F / C F / B F B B
B F F F / C / F

*119O; A / AA E / A / EA E / A / EA E
A / AE A / E / AA E / A
E / A / AB D / A B / A E / A

119P; F F B / F / C / F
F B F / B C / C / C G C / F
B C / F / F B G / B D# C / F

*119Q; tune “Come thou fount of every blessing”
E B / E / B B E E / A E E B / E
2nd line = 1st = 4TH
E AB / E B A E / AE E E CG / E B C B / E

*119R; tune “From every stormy wind that blows”
CG / C / CG C / F / C GC / G
GC G / C / G / C G / C F
C / G CG / C / CG C / F / G / C / C

*119S; FB / FC F / CB B / FF C / F C
FC F / FC F / FC C / DC D / B
CF C / F CC / F / / GF C / F

119t; D / DA D A / DG D A / D A A / D
D / DG D A / D E E / A / D D G / D
G D D / A DD / DG D D / D A A / D

*119U; tune “When I survey the wondrous cross” (C = C7)
F F C7 / F CD / C F C / F / F
B FC / F CF / C / F F C / F CD
C FC / F / F / C G / G CC / F

*119V; G / G / D7 (=”D”) G D D
G G CD G / D G / G
D G D D / G G C D / G

*119W; F / B FF / C / F / C
F / G / C / F C C / F
CF CF / C / F B B / F / F C / F

*119X; G G D / B D E G / D / G B F E / D
G D / G G GF E / D D DD GG / G
B B B FF / D / B G D E / D / G

120; A / A / F / BD D / A E
AA EE / EA D / A / FA D / DA E
A AD / E AC / B / A E / A

121A; E / E B / E / AA7 A / E A
E / E / B / B / E B / E
AA7 A / E A / EE E / E B / E / E

*121B; C / C C GC GC / F G C C / G D G D
G / C CG C C / C
F / F F G F / C GG / C

*121C; F / B F / C C F C / F / G C
F / B F / C C F C / F
G C / F / C C F / C / F C F C
F / B F / C F / C C F C / F

*122A; G / G G D D / G GD G G / C D G G / D
G / G G D D / G GC G GG / C E G D / G
G / C C D D / G GD G G / C G D G / GD
G / G G D D / G GD G G / C E G D / G

122B; tune “Guide me, O thou great Jehovah”
G C G G / GD GA G D / G C C C
G D G / G C G G / GD GA G D / G C G CA
G D G / D G D D / G D GD G
G G D G D G / D / G D GG CA / G D G

*123; DG / D G D D / G G D D / A D A D
DA DG / D G D D / D G D D
A A D A / D / A G D A / D

*124A; E / E B / E / AE A / B
EF BC /B FF / B E / E A / B E
AB E / EB B / EB E / CFE B / E

*124B; G D G / C G / D C C D / G / G C G
CC G / D G A A / D / D G G / DD G
A C G D / G / G G D / G D / G G ED A
D / G D G / D G A D / G D / G
Keep the speed (tempo) up on that one.

*125 -same as 121B.

*126A; No chords / no chords / no,no, E / E A EE BB / E
F / B / EB F / B no (or E) / no no no (or E) EB / EAE E
AE BE / EB EEE / E AAA / EBE B / E

126B; E / E A E / E
E B E / E B F / B / E
A / F / B
E E A / E B E / F E B / E

127A; G / GG D / GD G / CD C / G D / D / D G D
D / D / GD G / G / C / GD G / G D / G

*127B; G / C A / D // G / C / G D / G

128A; C / C G C EbF / B B F C
F C FF FF / CFC CG / C CF CC D
GC FF C CG / CC C CC G / C

*128B; tune “All the way my Savcior leads me”
A / A A E A / A / E E A E / A
A / D A E A / A E E E / B B E B / E
D E / A E A D / A A A E / A A D A / E
A E / A A E A / E D E D / A A A E / A
A E / A A E D / B D E D / A A A E / A
(To avoid a repetition the original Hebrew doesn’t have, skip the fourth line.)

129; G D G / D C / D D C G / D G
C F G / GF C / F C G D / G
B E E / D G / E F G G / F D
D / G D / B B F E / E D / G

*130A; E / E A EA EA / E / B E A B
E / A A AA A7A / E
B B E E / BB E / E E B B / E
(Again, avoid repetition by cutting fourth line–4th line of words in this one.)

?130B; E / E / B / E E B F
B / B F F / B / B / E
B E A E / A / B / E

*131; E / B E / EB B / E
A E E / E B / B / E A B / EF E
EA E / A / E E B / B / E

*132A; C / C / GF G / C CF
C G / C D / G / C / C
GFG FG / C / CF C / C G / C

*132B; E / E E B B / E E E A
E / B E E / E E B B
E E E A / E E E B / E
If using three flats, 3rd note from end takes B chord instead of E (a / e e B B / e ).
For variation, make 3rd note from end same as 4th from end, instead of changing from G to F there.

*133A; tune “O for 1000 tongues”
E / A A E E / A E A E / A A E A / E
E / A / D / A A A E / A

*133B; G / GD G / D G / G D /G C / D G / A / D
D / C D / GD G / D G / D / DG C / G D / G

*134A; D / D / G D D D
A A D A / D / D
G D D D / A A D A / D
D / E E D A / D
D / A A D A / D

134B; C G F C / F C F G C
G D G G C A / G D D G
C C C F F F / G G C C
F F D D B# B# / G C / C C C G F C
F G C G / C C C GC / G C

135A; F F D G / C F C / F / D G
C F B D / C / G D C E / D C F B
D DG / C C F GG / C //
E A E G / C C F F / E B C C
D G / C / F F B G / F F C F
D D G G / CF EE / F

*135B; G / G G G D / GD G G D / G G D G / D
G / G G G D / GD G G G / D D E A / D
G / D G D G / DA D G G / D G D G / D
G / G G D G / GG C C C / G G G D / G

*135C; B / B E B B / B
C F / C C F / B
B F F B / E E B B / F F B

*136A; G / G G G D / G G D G / G G D G / C
C / G G G D / G G D G / G G D G / D G
G / G G G C / G G D G / G G C G / G D
G / G G G D / G G D G / G G D G / D G

*136B; E / E E B B / E A E A / E E B B / B E
E / E B B E / G G Ab Ab / B G C D / D G
C / C GC B B / C GC B E / A E B E / E B
B / E B E E / G C B A / E E E B / B E
“Iambic” on 136A and B makes it hard to swap tunes (see above) for these; same number of syllables, but different stresses (different ones emphasized), I think.

*137; E / E E E BE / A A E E
E E A EE / B E / E E A E
AE EB E EB / E E E B / E

Pray *138A; F / FC F / CC7 C / F / F
FC F / FC F / C C C D / CB C
F B / C / B / FC F / BF C / F

138B; C / C / FF FG / CG G / C
C / C / G / G CG / C
FF FG CG G / C / CCC G / C G / C

Pray 139A; E / E / B7E B7B7 / E / E F E
E / EB7 B7E / B7 / E B7 B7 / F B7
EB7 EA / B7 / E / A F / E B7 / E

139B; E / A E / B / B / B E B
E / EB F / B / B F B / E F
FA E / AB E / B A / B E / FF B / E

139C=139A

*140A; A / E A A D / D E A A
E E D A / E A / E A D A
E B E E / D D A E / A

140B; G / B C F DG / GG BC D G
B C A C / G F / G GF F C
GG FB C D / G G B B / D

Pray *141A; CG / C / C G / CG F / CG C
F C / GG C / C / G CG / C / C G
CG F / C / F G / C G / C / C

?141B; G / G C G G / G D G G
D D E A / D / G D G G
C G C D / G C G D/ G

Pray ?142; B / B / E F / B
B B F / G D / G / B / B
F / B / B E B / F / B

Pray 143A; E / E B B E / A A E B / E
A / A E E B / E E F F / B
E E B / E E E B / E E B E / A
B A B / E E E B / E E A B / E

?143B; tune “I need thee every hour”
A / A E A E / A / D G D D / A
a / e a e e / a / e b e b / e
a / a a d a / ae e / e a a e / ea
A / D / AA B / A A E E / A

*143C; tune “Fairest Lord Jesus”
F B B / G C F / F F D / C C F / F F B
F C F / C F / C / F B F / D D C
B D B / C C F / F F F B / F C / F

Pray 144A; DA / D DA D DA / F A E D
E E D AA / D / G D AB EG
F G D D / G G E A / D

?144B; D / D A / D / G / D
DA D / AD A / D / G / GA G
D / D / A D / AG A / D

144C; C / C C F G / C CG / D C FG C / CG
CF / C C A G / CFG D G / C GD G D / G
CF / C DD C CG / C D G G / C GC B CD
G CF G G / CC DG / CEC F / C GEG / C

*144D; G / G D G CC / G / G G D DD / G
2nd line = 1st
G / G G G CG / GD DG D D / G G GG DG
DA DA D GD / GGG DC / G GD / G D / G
Great tune by iteslf (hymn “Arise O God and shine”), but if energetic, throw in a D note above the A note on the last D chord (at least on last stanza or two).

*145A; tune sometimes used for Doxology
E E B / E AB / E BA / B / E
A EE / BB E / B / E E B / E
AE BE / B / E A B / EEE B / E B E

*145B; B B F / B / EF EF / B / E
B FF / FB FC / F / B B F / B
EF EF / E / E / B / BF BF / B

*145C; E / EA B / E / E A / E / E B
AF E / BB E / EB B / B F / B
EE F / B E / AB E / B E / EBE B / E

*146A; tune “What a friend we have in Jesus”
F F B F F F / B / F / C
F F B F F F / B / F F F C F C / F
C B# C F C C / F / B B F F C F / C
4th line = 2nd

?146B; G D C C / C E D D
G G C A / C A GB / G G A D
A E D G / G D G G / C D G

?147A; G / G/ D GD / G
C G / G DA / D / G / G
D GD / G D / G CA / G D / G
Change first five words printed into “You! Praise Jehovah;”
change first four words of stanza two to “Jehovah builds”…

*147B; D / D A G D / A A D AD / A A D D / D
DD / D A G D / A A D D / G A D A / D
AD / A A A D / D A A DA / D GD A D / DA
DD / D A G D / A A D D / G A D A / D

*148; C /C / C / G C G C / C
C C G C / F C / G C G D / G
G C / G / G C / G C
C G C C / F G C GG / C GG / C

*149; C / C F G F / C F C C / F G C G / C
C / C C G F / C F C CD / G D G D / G
G / G G C C / G G C C / G C F F / CG
G / C F G F / C F C C / F G C G / C

*150A; A / A B / E A / DA EE / A
C A / D A / E A / EE A / A E
A B / E ED / AE A / DA EE / A

150B; F / F C F C / F F C F
F C F C / F F B F / F C F C
F F F C / F C F F F B / F B C B C
C / C C F F AoverF C FC //
F F F B B C / B C C
F F C F F B F / C / F
F / F / F F C
F G Bb D# D# / Bb D# D# G / CCF C / F

c7. Why sing Psalms?
1–They were written to be SUNG, not just preached on, not just sung little bits of. I’d rather tell Mick Jagger and Amy Grant that Psalm 119 is a singable lyric, than tell the Holy Ghost that it is not. (Besides, I routinely sing it, so I know not just by theology but by experience that it IS a singable lyric. [I can chant Psalm 119, all 176 verses, in about 15 minutes. Using BPS and playing each tune through once before singing it, and singing it more slowly, can take about 45.])

2–Love triune Jehovah, love His lyrics (ALL of EACH lyric as a UNIT, the way He inspired them.) (Well, lyric-concepts if not precisely lyrics.)
3–Love men, teach ’em the best lyrics, stuff they’ll be glad to know even if they become the next Billy Graham or the next pope.
4–the Psalms teach us about Jesus (Luke 24:44), for example, giving us how He felt, e.g. Psalm 22:1. As you sing or read Psalms, connect them with our Lord. He knew them and they speak of Him. Relate Psalms to Jesus. He, at least, can sing the passages that sound self-righteous with perfect truth. The discomfort of putting in His mouth passages that speak of the Psalmist’s sinfulness may help make us less comfortable with sin–WE, I, put Jesus through THIS, this is how MY folly feels to God?!?!? Some prophesy of events in His life and His Church’s life. Relate Psalms to Jesus.
5–The songs of men may be:
-a. wrong, but God’s songs are right.
-b. shallow, but God’s songs are deep.
-c. timebound, but God’s songs eternal.
-d. divisive, but God’s songs universal.
-e. complacent, but God’s songs challenging.
c, d, e–The songs of God unite us with our brothers across personal and cultural lines. Are we young? They unite us with the old. Are we safe? They unite us with the persecuted, e.g. our brothers in Iraq, Saudi Arabia, North Korea, and mainland China. Are we weak? They unite us with the Strong.
–If we sing men’s songs, how much more ALL of EACH of God’s! (A Psalter is a good start; the Bible also includes other songs, but I don’t know if they’ve all been collected to music yet.)
6–Ephesians 4:19 and Colossians 3:16 call for “psalms and hymns and spiritual songs;” I Corinthians 14:26 says “each of you has a psalm;” James 5:13 says “Is any merry? Let him psalmize.” To obey these orders (love God, obey God’s orders, John 14:15), we need to learn/teach/be taught psalms; and is there any part of any psalm not “profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for training in righteousness” according to II Timothy 3:16?
–God the Holy Ghost inspired the Psalms, and Eph 4:18-20 contrasts drunkenness (don’t) with being filled with the Spirit and singing the Spirit’s music (do). I believe “psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs” calls for a mixture–various kinds of music, not only Psalms– but I think Psalms as God inspired them (ALL of EACH as a UNIT) should be part of the mix, not neglected. Let us learn to sing all the Psalms. A determined individual can do this; a family can; a church (congregation) can; a group can; I think ordinarily a church should TEACH its members to be familiar with all the Psalms. A Christian school (any level, KG thru seminary) could do the same.
–The Psalms in general, and BPS in particular, are a tool by which we may express and grow (and stre-e-etch) our love for God and one another. They are NOT a box we must crawl into, and then boast with pride that WE are in the right box!
–Feel free to improve on BPS. In my own use of it, I often modernize old-fashioned language when convenient (replace “thou” with “you,” “cast” with “throw,” “slay” with “kill,” etc)–and when NOT convenient, I don’t feel compelled to modernize! I put “Jehovah” for “LORD” when convenient (and not when not); I swap tunes (c5 above; “78A” is one I like a lot.)
–I say again: I keep singing through the Psalms–and I encourage you to learn to do likewise–because I love their Author and want to get to know Him better, and to know particular things to trust Him for, such as the victory of His Gospel over all His, its, and my enemies, and His forgiveness of my sins as I repent and trust Him, and the heart of Jesus my Lord. I use the musical Psalter called BPS because it gives me all of each Psalm in a fairly accurate and complete translation with a tune I can play and sing. (If a thing is worth doing, it’s worth doing badly?–wrote G. K. Chesterton??) I like most of BPS, but I freely try to improve, for my own use, some of its tunes and lyrics. I also sing psalm fragments, paraphrases, applications, and Christian music having nothing to do with Psalms at all; the Bible includes songs that are not “Psalms,” and calls for “new songs.” God bless you as you praise Him, in and out of song. May our lives bring him praise.
7–Love triune Jehovah, love His lyrics (again.)
Andrew Lohr, 22 May A.D. 2007 (between ascension and pentecost.) Edited 6 Sept ’07.

c8. BLOG zone–stuff I think to be of limited interest and value.
c8d1: What I think of “The Plainsong Psalter” (Copyright A.D. 1988 by The Church Pension Fund. The Church Hymnal Corporation, 445 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10016. No ISBN seen in my copy.) Edited by James Litton. Episcopalian product, I think. Thank you, Paul Buckley, for your teaching and encouragement with this book at BH ’07.
These notes might interest musicians wanting to dip into this book or wanting to teach it starting with parts that are easier for their students to like.
I worked through all of this, not because I care for much of the music, but because I’m German, and because my highly esteemed brother Jim Jordan thinks the psalms should be chanted or sung to music that lets one sing an accurate translation, not changing the English to rhyme and scan. (I’m glad to be back into BPS for my daily (more or less) psalming.)
My three favorites were Psalms 92, 113, and 138; the notes I made in my copy indicate I liked these more than most. My favorite tune seems to have been chant 3 with ending 4, used 12 times all of which I liked. Chant 5 ending 1 I liked 13 times and didn’t twice; chant 6, liked 11-12 times and disliked 3; chant 8 ending 1, liked 16 times and disliked 6. Chant 3 ending 5, chant 4 ending 4, and chant 8 ending 2, I disliked every time, unless I modified them a bit.
A common problem (for my taste) was chants that didn’t end–“It ends. 132 doesn’t,” I jotted at 133–meaning that the last note or set of notes didn’t sound, to me, as if they brought the chant to a solid close. I added an F note after the G note at the end of Psalm 135 to end it; likewise with 137 and 72 (all three, chant 1 ending 1, which I never liked unless modified.) On Psalm 139 I cut the last note (the G).
I often sang the post-antiphon opening notes on every line that had enough syllables.
The chants may have grown on me a little; I liked 14 of the first 30, 16 of the next 30, 19 of the 3rd 30, 32 of the 4th 30 (14 of the 32 in Psalm 119), and 15 of the last 30. (Rather than start with one of my favorites in the dubious confidence that it’ll be liked, you might try to warm up with one or two or a few others.)
Fwiw. Use freely.

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